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Identifying cross-cultural variations in psychostimulant use for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder using linked data

Overview of attention for article published in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, March 2017
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Title
Identifying cross-cultural variations in psychostimulant use for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder using linked data
Published in
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13034-017-0152-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Manonita Ghosh, C. D’Arcy J. Holman, David B. Preen, Manonita Ghosh, C. D’Arcy J. Holman, David B. Preen

Abstract

To validate the association between country-of-birth and disparities in the stimulant use for ADHD among individuals in Western Australia. Using linked data, a population-based retrospective cohort of individuals admitted to hospital before age 25 years was followed through to identify having stimulants for ADHD in 2003-2007. Multivariate logistic and linear regressions were used to characterise associations between stimulants and country-of-birth, geographical remoteness and socioeconomic status. Of 679,645 individuals, 14,122 (2.1%) had a record of having stimulants for ADHD. Of these, 205 (1.5%) were born in Africa, Asia, Middle-East or South America, while 13,664 (96.8%) were born in Australia/New Zealand, Europe or North America. Individuals with traditionally non-Anglophonic backgrounds were around one-half as likely to have stimulants as individuals with Anglophonic backgrounds (OR = 0.53, 95% CI 0.46-0.61, p < 0.001). Non-Anglophones were an average of 2.7 years older than Anglophones at onset of having stimulants. Individuals from remote and disadvantaged backgrounds had stimulants at younger ages than individuals living in metropolitan areas and with least disadvantage. The results highlight the importance of identifying factors underlying cultural differences in stimulant treatment for ADHD. Improving awareness of cultural variations may foster trust and rapport between patients and clinicians, and so better facilitate the appropriate and effective treatment of ADHD for each patient.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 3 20%
Researcher 3 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 20%
Student > Master 3 20%
Lecturer 2 13%
Other 1 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 6 40%
Unspecified 3 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 13%
Social Sciences 2 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 13%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 March 2017.
All research outputs
#7,999,025
of 9,227,643 outputs
Outputs from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#336
of 370 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#219,285
of 260,191 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#15
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,227,643 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 370 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,191 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.