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Eye tracking in early autism research

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, September 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#5 of 322)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
23 tweeters
patent
2 patents
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
96 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
339 Mendeley
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Title
Eye tracking in early autism research
Published in
Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, September 2013
DOI 10.1186/1866-1955-5-28
Pubmed ID
Authors

Terje Falck-Ytter, Sven Bölte, Gustaf Gredebäck

Abstract

Eye tracking has the potential to characterize autism at a unique intermediate level, with links 'down' to underlying neurocognitive networks, as well as 'up' to everyday function and dysfunction. Because it is non-invasive and does not require advanced motor responses or language, eye tracking is particularly important for the study of young children and infants. In this article, we review eye tracking studies of young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and children at risk for ASD. Reduced looking time at people and faces, as well as problems with disengagement of attention, appear to be among the earliest signs of ASD, emerging during the first year of life. In toddlers with ASD, altered looking patterns across facial parts such as the eyes and mouth have been found, together with limited orienting to biological motion. We provide a detailed discussion of these and other key findings and highlight methodological opportunities and challenges for eye tracking research of young children with ASD. We conclude that eye tracking can reveal important features of the complex picture of autism.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 23 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 339 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Malaysia 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Singapore 1 <1%
Other 3 <1%
Unknown 323 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 71 21%
Student > Master 62 18%
Researcher 57 17%
Student > Bachelor 37 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 26 8%
Other 59 17%
Unknown 27 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 133 39%
Medicine and Dentistry 30 9%
Computer Science 25 7%
Neuroscience 25 7%
Social Sciences 16 5%
Other 67 20%
Unknown 43 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 78. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 November 2018.
All research outputs
#260,754
of 15,184,319 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
#5
of 322 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,172
of 167,411 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,184,319 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 322 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 167,411 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them