↓ Skip to main content

Neural Correlates of Alcohol-Approach Bias in Alcohol Addiction: the Spirit is Willing but the Flesh is Weak for Spirits

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychopharmacology, September 2013
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
50 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
117 Mendeley
Title
Neural Correlates of Alcohol-Approach Bias in Alcohol Addiction: the Spirit is Willing but the Flesh is Weak for Spirits
Published in
Neuropsychopharmacology, September 2013
DOI 10.1038/npp.2013.252
Pubmed ID
Authors

Corinde E Wiers, Christine Stelzel, Soyoung Q Park, Christiane K Gawron, Vera U Ludwig, Stefan Gutwinski, Andreas Heinz, Johannes Lindenmeyer, Reinout W Wiers, Henrik Walter, Felix Bermpohl

Abstract

Behavioral studies have shown an alcohol-approach bias in alcohol-dependent patients: the automatic tendency to faster approach than avoid alcohol compared with neutral cues, which has been associated with craving and relapse. Although this is a well-studied psychological phenomenon, little is known about the brain processes underlying automatic action tendencies in addiction. We examined 20 alcohol-dependent patients and 17 healthy controls with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), while performing an implicit approach-avoidance task. Participants pushed and pulled pictorial cues of alcohol and soft-drink beverages, according to a content-irrelevant feature of the cue (landscape/portrait). The critical fMRI contrast regarding the alcohol-approach bias was defined as (approach alcohol>avoid alcohol)>(approach soft drink>avoid soft drink). This was reversed for the avoid-alcohol contrast: (avoid alcohol>approach alcohol)>(avoid soft drink>approach soft drink). In comparison with healthy controls, alcohol-dependent patients had stronger behavioral approach tendencies for alcohol cues than for soft-drink cues. In the approach, alcohol fMRI contrast patients showed larger blood-oxygen-level-dependent responses in the nucleus accumbens and medial prefrontal cortex, regions involved in reward and motivational processing. In alcohol-dependent patients, alcohol-craving scores were positively correlated with activity in the amygdala for the approach-alcohol contrast. The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex was not activated in the avoid-alcohol contrast in patients vs controls. Our data suggest that brain regions that have a key role in reward and motivation are associated with the automatic alcohol-approach bias in alcohol-dependent patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 117 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 4 3%
Netherlands 3 3%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 2 2%
United States 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 105 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 27%
Student > Master 25 21%
Researcher 22 19%
Unspecified 9 8%
Student > Bachelor 7 6%
Other 22 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 56 48%
Unspecified 19 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 9%
Neuroscience 8 7%
Other 8 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 February 2014.
All research outputs
#1,531,652
of 3,628,077 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychopharmacology
#1,207
of 2,419 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,436
of 92,042 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychopharmacology
#44
of 97 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,628,077 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 55th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,419 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 92,042 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 97 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.