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A Single Neurotoxic Dose of Methamphetamine Induces a Long-Lasting Depressive-Like Behaviour in Mice

Overview of attention for article published in Neurotoxicity Research, September 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

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14 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

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42 Mendeley
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Title
A Single Neurotoxic Dose of Methamphetamine Induces a Long-Lasting Depressive-Like Behaviour in Mice
Published in
Neurotoxicity Research, September 2013
DOI 10.1007/s12640-013-9423-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carlos D. Silva, Ana F. Neves, Ana I. Dias, Hugo J. Freitas, Sheena M. Mendes, Inês Pita, Sofia D. Viana, Paulo A. de Oliveira, Rodrigo A. Cunha, Carlos A. Fontes Ribeiro, Rui D. Prediger, Frederico C. Pereira

Abstract

Methamphetamine (METH) triggers a disruption of the monoaminergic system and METH abuse leads to negative emotional states including depressive symptoms during drug withdrawal. However, it is currently unknown if the acute toxic dosage of METH also causes a long-lasting depressive phenotype and persistent monoaminergic deficits. Thus, we now assessed the depressive-like behaviour in mice at early and long-term periods following a single high METH dose (30 mg/kg, i.p.). METH did not alter the motor function and procedural memory of mice as assessed by swimming speed and escape latency to find the platform in a cued version of the water maze task. However, METH significantly increased the immobility time in the tail suspension test at 3 and 49 days post-administration. This depressive-like profile induced by METH was accompanied by a marked depletion of frontostriatal dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotransmission, indicated by a reduction in the levels of dopamine, DOPAC and HVA, tyrosine hydroxylase and serotonin, observed at both 3 and 49 days post-administration. In parallel, another neurochemical feature of depression--astroglial dysfunction--was unaffected in the cortex and the striatal levels of the astrocytic protein marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein, were only transiently increased at 3 days. These findings demonstrate for the first time that a single high dose of METH induces long-lasting depressive-like behaviour in mice associated with a persistent disruption of frontostriatal dopaminergic and serotonergic homoeostasis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 2%
South Africa 1 2%
Unknown 40 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 26%
Student > Bachelor 7 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 14%
Professor 4 10%
Researcher 4 10%
Other 8 19%
Unknown 2 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 9 21%
Psychology 6 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 12%
Chemistry 4 10%
Other 9 21%
Unknown 4 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 October 2013.
All research outputs
#2,053,819
of 16,991,496 outputs
Outputs from Neurotoxicity Research
#60
of 708 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,354
of 175,039 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neurotoxicity Research
#3
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,991,496 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 708 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 175,039 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.