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Endocrinology and physiology of pseudocyesis

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#29 of 696)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
6 tweeters
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
78 Mendeley
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Title
Endocrinology and physiology of pseudocyesis
Published in
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1477-7827-11-39
Pubmed ID
Authors

Juan J Tarín, Carlos Hermenegildo, Miguel A García-Pérez, Antonio Cano

Abstract

This literature review on pseudocyesis or false pregnancy aims to find epidemiological, psychiatric/psychologic, gynecological and endocrine traits associated with this condition in order to propose neuroendocrine/endocrine mechanisms leading to the emergence of pseudocyetic traits. Ten women from 5 selected studies were analyzed after applying stringent criteria to discriminate between cases of true pseudocyesis (pseudocyesis vera) versus delusional, simulated or erroneous pseudocyesis. The analysis of the reviewed studies evidenced that pseudocyesis shares many endocrine traits with both polycystic ovarian syndrome and major depressive disorder, although the endocrine traits are more akin to polycystic ovarian syndrome than to major depressive disorder. Data support the notion that pseudocyetic women may have increased sympathetic nervous system activity, dysfunction of central nervous system catecholaminergic pathways and decreased steroid feedback inhibition of gonadotropin-releasing hormone. Although other neuroendocrine/endocrine pathways may be involved, the neuroendocrine/endocrine mechanisms proposed in this review may lead to the development of pseudocyetic traits including hypomenorrhea or amenorrhea, galactorrhea, diurnal and/or nocturnal hyperprolactinemia, abdominal distension and apparent fetal movements and labor pains at the expected date of delivery.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Unknown 76 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 16 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 10%
Student > Postgraduate 7 9%
Researcher 7 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 9%
Other 21 27%
Unknown 12 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 29 37%
Psychology 7 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 4%
Other 11 14%
Unknown 17 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 34. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 May 2021.
All research outputs
#745,917
of 17,698,884 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#29
of 696 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,262
of 177,173 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,698,884 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 696 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 177,173 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them