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Evidence for a receiver bias underlying female preference for a male mating pheromone in sea lamprey

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, November 2013
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

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25 Mendeley
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Title
Evidence for a receiver bias underlying female preference for a male mating pheromone in sea lamprey
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, November 2013
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2013.1966
Pubmed ID
Authors

T. J. Buchinger, H. Wang, W. Li, N. S. Johnson

Abstract

Receiver bias models suggest that a male sexual signal became exaggerated to match a pre-existing sensory, perceptual or cognitive disposition of the female. Accordingly, these models predict that females of related taxa possessing the ancestral state of signalling evolved preference for the male trait in a non-sexual context. We postulated that female preference for the male-released bile alcohol mating pheromone, 3 keto petromyzonol sulfate (3kPZS), of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) evolved as a result of a receiver bias. In particular, we propose that migratory silver lamprey (Ichthyomyzon unicuspis), a basal member of the Petromyzontidae, evolved a preference for 3kPZS released by stream-resident larvae as a means of identifying productive habitat for offspring. Larval silver lamprey released 3kPZS at rates sufficient to be detected by migratory lampreys. Females responded to 3kPZS by exhibiting upstream movement behaviours relevant in a migratory context, but did not exhibit proximate behaviours important to mate search and spawning. Male silver lamprey did not release 3kPZS at rates sufficient to be detected by females in natural high-volume stream environments. We infer that female silver lamprey cue onto 3kPZS excreted by stream-resident larvae as a mechanism to locate habitat conducive to offspring survival and that males do not signal with 3kPZS. We suggest that this female preference for a male signal in a non-sexual context represents a bias leading to the sexual signalling observed in sea lamprey.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 4%
Unknown 24 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 28%
Researcher 5 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 16%
Student > Bachelor 3 12%
Student > Postgraduate 3 12%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 2 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 60%
Environmental Science 2 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 8%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 October 2013.
All research outputs
#293,636
of 4,507,280 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#1,299
of 4,221 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,468
of 99,198 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#4
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,280 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,221 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 99,198 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.