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Pufferfish mortality associated with novel polar marine toxins in Hawaii

Overview of attention for article published in Diseases of Aquatic Organisms, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
8 Mendeley
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Title
Pufferfish mortality associated with novel polar marine toxins in Hawaii
Published in
Diseases of Aquatic Organisms, March 2017
DOI 10.3354/dao03096
Pubmed ID
Authors

TM Work, PDR Moeller, KR Beauchesne, J Dagenais, R Breeden, R Rameyer, WJ Walsh, M Abecassis, DR Kobayashi, C Conway, J Winton, Thierry M. Work, Peter D. R. Moeller, Kevin R. Beauchesne, Julie Dagenais, Renee Breeden, Robert Rameyer, William J. Walsh, Melanie Abecassis, Donald R. Kobayashi, Carla Conway, James Winton, Work, Thierry M., Moeller, Perer D. R., Beauchesne, Kevin R., Dagenais, Julie, Breeden, Renee, Rameyer, Robert, Walsh, Willliam A., Abecassis, Melanie, Kobayashi, Donald R., Conway, Carla M., Winton, James

Abstract

Fish die-offs are important signals in tropical marine ecosystems. In 2010, a mass mortality of pufferfish in Hawaii (USA) was dominated by Arothron hispidus showing aberrant neurological behaviors. Using pathology, toxinology, and field surveys, we implicated a series of novel, polar, marine toxins as a likely cause of this mass mortality. Our findings are striking in that (1) a marine toxin was associated with a kill of a fish species that is itself toxic; (2) we provide a plausible mechanism to explain clinical signs of affected fish; and (3) this epizootic likely depleted puffer populations. Whilst our data are compelling, we did not synthesize the toxin de novo, and we were unable to categorically prove that the polar toxins caused mortality or that they were metabolites of an undefined parent compound. However, our approach does provide a template for marine fish kill investigations associated with marine toxins and inherent limitations of existing methods. Our study also highlights the need for more rapid and cost-effective tools to identify new marine toxins, particularly small, highly polar molecules.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 38%
Student > Bachelor 2 25%
Researcher 2 25%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 38%
Environmental Science 2 25%
Unspecified 1 13%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 13%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 March 2017.
All research outputs
#4,110,384
of 9,264,233 outputs
Outputs from Diseases of Aquatic Organisms
#286
of 540 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,551
of 260,239 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diseases of Aquatic Organisms
#4
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,264,233 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 54th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 540 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,239 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.