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Schistosomiasis is more prevalent than previously thought: what does it mean for public health goals, policies, strategies, guidelines and intervention programs?

Overview of attention for article published in Infectious Diseases of Poverty, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#46 of 623)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
23 tweeters

Citations

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70 Dimensions

Readers on

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123 Mendeley
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Title
Schistosomiasis is more prevalent than previously thought: what does it mean for public health goals, policies, strategies, guidelines and intervention programs?
Published in
Infectious Diseases of Poverty, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40249-017-0275-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel G. Colley, Tamara S. Andros, Carl H. Campbell

Abstract

Mapping and diagnosis of infections by the three major schistosome species (Schistosoma haematobium, S. mansoni and S. japonicum) has been done with assays that are known to be specific but increasingly insensitive as prevalence declines or in areas with already low prevalence of infection. This becomes a true challenge to achieving the goal of elimination of schistosomiasis because the multiplicative portion of the life-cycle of schistosomes, in the snail vector, favors continued transmission as long as even a few people maintain low numbers of worms that pass eggs in their excreta. New mapping tools based on detection of worm antigens (circulating cathodic antigen - CCA; circulating anodic antigen - CAA) in urine of those infected are highly sensitive and the CAA assay is reported to be highly specific. Using these tools in areas of low prevalence of all three of these species of schistosomes has demonstrated that more people harbor adult worms than are regularly excreting eggs at a level detectable by the usual stool assay (Kato-Katz) or by urine filtration. In very low prevalence areas this is sometimes 6- to10-fold more. Faced with what appears to be a sizable population of "egg-negative/worm-positive schistosomiasis" especially in areas of very low prevalence, national NTD programs are confounded about what guidelines and strategies they should enact if they are to proceed toward a goal of elimination. There is a critical need for continued evaluation of the assays involved and to understand the contribution of this "egg-negative/worm-positive schistosomiasis" condition to both individual morbidity and community transmission. There is also a critical need for new guidelines based on the use of these more sensitive assays for those national NTD programs that wish to move forward to strategies designed for elimination.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 23 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 123 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 123 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 21%
Student > Master 23 19%
Student > Postgraduate 11 9%
Student > Bachelor 10 8%
Researcher 8 7%
Other 21 17%
Unknown 24 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 13 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 7%
Other 20 16%
Unknown 31 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 April 2017.
All research outputs
#1,321,350
of 16,168,756 outputs
Outputs from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#46
of 623 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,883
of 268,393 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#1
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,168,756 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 623 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,393 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.