↓ Skip to main content

Physicians under the Influence: Social Psychology and Industry Marketing Strategies

Overview of attention for article published in The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics, January 2021
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#37 of 1,177)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
38 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
122 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
157 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Physicians under the Influence: Social Psychology and Industry Marketing Strategies
Published in
The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics, January 2021
DOI 10.1111/jlme.12076
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sunita Sah, Adriane Fugh-Berman

Abstract

Pharmaceutical and medical device companies apply social psychology to influence physicians' prescribing behavior and decision making. Physicians fail to recognize their vulnerability to commercial influences due to self-serving bias, rationalization, and cognitive dissonance. Professionalism offers little protection; even the most conscious and genuine commitment to ethical behavior cannot eliminate unintentional, subconscious bias. Six principles of influence - reciprocation, commitment, social proof, liking, authority, and scarcity - are key to the industry's routine marketing strategies, which rely on the illusion that the industry is a generous avuncular partner to physicians. In order to resist industry influence, physicians must accept that they are vulnerable to subconscious bias and have both the motivation and means to resist industry influence. A culture in which accepting industry gifts engenders shame rather than gratitude will reduce conflicts of interest. If greater academic prestige accrues to distant rather than close relationships with industry, then a new social norm may emerge that promotes patient care and scientific integrity. In addition to educating faculty and students about the social psychology underlying sophisticated but potentially manipulative marketing and about how to resist it, academic medical institutions should develop strong organizational policies to counteract the medical profession's improper dependence on industry.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 38 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 157 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
Australia 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 151 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 13%
Student > Master 19 12%
Researcher 18 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 18 11%
Student > Bachelor 15 10%
Other 37 24%
Unknown 29 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 35 22%
Business, Management and Accounting 21 13%
Psychology 17 11%
Social Sciences 16 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 5%
Other 19 12%
Unknown 41 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 64. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 February 2022.
All research outputs
#550,921
of 22,581,456 outputs
Outputs from The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics
#37
of 1,177 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#19,455
of 493,862 outputs
Outputs of similar age from The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics
#5
of 73 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,581,456 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,177 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 493,862 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 73 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.