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Complex multifault rupture during the 2016 Mw 7.8 Kaikōura earthquake, New Zealand

Overview of attention for article published in Science, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
38 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
110 tweeters
facebook
8 Facebook pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
217 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
213 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Complex multifault rupture during the 2016 Mw 7.8 Kaikōura earthquake, New Zealand
Published in
Science, March 2017
DOI 10.1126/science.aam7194
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ian J. Hamling, Sigrún Hreinsdóttir, Kate Clark, John Elliott, Cunren Liang, Eric Fielding, Nicola Litchfield, Pilar Villamor, Laura Wallace, Tim J. Wright, Elisabetta D’Anastasio, Stephen Bannister, David Burbidge, Paul Denys, Paula Gentle, Jamie Howarth, Christof Mueller, Neville Palmer, Chris Pearson, William Power, Philip Barnes, David J. A. Barrell, Russ Van Dissen, Robert Langridge, Tim Little, Andrew Nicol, Jarg Pettinga, Julie Rowland, Mark Stirling

Abstract

On 14th November 2016, the northeastern South Island of New Zealand was struck by a major Mw 7.8 earthquake. Field observations, in conjunction with InSAR, GPS, and seismology reveal this to be one of the most complex earthquakes ever recorded. The rupture propagated northward for more than 170 km along both mapped and unmapped faults, before continuing offshore at its northeastern extent. Geodetic and field observations reveal surface ruptures along at least 12 major faults, including possible slip along the southern Hikurangi subduction interface, extensive uplift along much of the coastline and widespread anelastic deformation including the ~8 m uplift of a fault-bounded block. This complex earthquake defies many conventional assumptions about the degree to which earthquake ruptures are controlled by fault segmentation, and should motivate re-thinking of these issues in seismic hazard models.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 110 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 213 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Costa Rica 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Unknown 206 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 57 27%
Student > Master 40 19%
Researcher 39 18%
Student > Bachelor 17 8%
Other 9 4%
Other 30 14%
Unknown 21 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 140 66%
Environmental Science 9 4%
Engineering 8 4%
Physics and Astronomy 6 3%
Computer Science 3 1%
Other 11 5%
Unknown 36 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 397. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 February 2020.
All research outputs
#30,092
of 14,574,743 outputs
Outputs from Science
#1,432
of 64,742 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,482
of 264,522 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science
#60
of 1,004 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,574,743 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 64,742 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 47.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,522 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,004 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.