↓ Skip to main content

World Health Organization-defined eosinophilic disorders: 2015 update on diagnosis, risk stratification, and management

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Hematology, October 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

wikipedia
8 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
71 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
81 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
World Health Organization-defined eosinophilic disorders: 2015 update on diagnosis, risk stratification, and management
Published in
American Journal of Hematology, October 2015
DOI 10.1002/ajh.24196
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jason Gotlib

Abstract

The eosinophilias encompass a broad range of non-hematologic (secondary or reactive) and hematologic (primary, clonal) disorders with potential for end-organ damage. Hypereosinophilia has generally been defined as a peripheral blood eosinophil count greater than 1,500/mm(3) and may be associated with tissue damage. After exclusion of secondary causes of eosinophilia, diagnostic evaluation of primary eosinophilias relies on a combination of morphologic review of the blood and marrow, standard cytogenetics, fluorescent in situ-hybridization, flow immunocytometry, and T-cell clonality assessment to detect histopathologic or clonal evidence for an acute or chronic myeloid or lymphoproliferative disorder. Disease prognosis relies on identifying the subtype of eosinophilia. After evaluation of secondary causes of eosinophilia, the 2008 World Health Organization establishes a semi-molecular classification scheme of disease subtypes including 'myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms with eosinophilia and abnormalities of PDGFRA, PDGFRB, or FGFR1', chronic eosinophilic leukemia, not otherwise specified, (CEL, NOS), lymphocyte-variant hypereosinophilia, and idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES), which is a diagnosis of exclusion. The goal of the therapy is to mitigate eosinophil-mediated organ damage. For patients with milder forms of eosinophilia (e.g. < 1,500/mm(3) ) without symptoms or signs of organ involvement, a watch and wait approach with close-follow-up may be undertaken. Identification of rearranged PDGFRA or PDGFRB is critical because of the exquisite responsiveness of these diseases to imatinib. Corticosteroids are first-line therapy for patients with lymphocyte-variant hypereosinophilia and HES. Hydroxyurea and interferon-alpha have demonstrated efficacy as initial treatment and steroid-refractory cases of HES. In addition to hydroxyurea, second line cytotoxic chemotherapy agents and hematopoietic cell transplant have been used for aggressive forms of HES and CEL with outcomes reported for limited numbers of patients. Although clinical trials have been performed with anti IL-5 (mepolizumab) and anti-CD52 (alemtuzumab) antibodies, their therapeutic role in primary eosinophilic diseases and HES has yet to be established. Am. J. Hematol. 90:1077-1089, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 81 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Japan 1 1%
Italy 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 76 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 16 20%
Researcher 16 20%
Student > Postgraduate 10 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Other 21 26%
Unknown 6 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 53 65%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 2%
Computer Science 2 2%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 9 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 November 2017.
All research outputs
#3,484,064
of 12,180,532 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Hematology
#408
of 1,881 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#93,243
of 263,642 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Hematology
#10
of 71 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,180,532 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,881 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,642 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 71 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.