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Three patients presenting with severe macrosomia and congenital hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a case series

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Medical Case Reports, March 2017
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Title
Three patients presenting with severe macrosomia and congenital hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a case series
Published in
Journal of Medical Case Reports, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13256-017-1231-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marie Vincent, Nadir Benbrik, Bénédicte Romefort, Agnès Colombel, Stéphane Bézieau, Bertrand Isidor

Abstract

Macrosomia and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are two features often associated in neonates of diabetic mothers. We report the cases of three patients with severe macrosomia and critical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy without severely unbalanced maternal diabetes. Only three patients with those two features and no uncontrolled maternal diabetes have been previously reported. The first patient was a 39-week-old girl, the second patient was a 39-week-old girl, and the third patient was a 41-week-old boy. The two French girls and the French boy had severe macrosomia and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, leading to the death of the boy. The outcome of the two girls was favorable, with a standardization of growth curves and ventricular hypertrophy. Their mothers presented with high body mass index but no severe documented maternal diabetes; glycemic imbalance was only suspected on postnatal analyses. There was no hydramnios during pregnancy and no other environmental factor, especially toxic exposure. Their parents are from Mayotte, Guadeloupe, and Guinea-Conakry. The usual genetics causes, Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, and chromosomal copy number variation, were also excluded. This report suggests the implication of other factors in addition to glycemic disorders, including genetic factors, in the occurrence of macrosomia and severe hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in neonates. These three original observations indicate that gynecologists and neonatologists should pay attention to neonates from mothers with a high body mass index and when maternal diabetes is not documented.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 6 25%
Student > Bachelor 5 21%
Researcher 4 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 13%
Student > Master 2 8%
Other 4 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 38%
Unspecified 8 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 17%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 4%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Other 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 March 2017.
All research outputs
#9,071,181
of 11,330,364 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Medical Case Reports
#944
of 1,684 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#190,576
of 263,202 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Medical Case Reports
#37
of 97 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,330,364 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,684 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 97 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.