↓ Skip to main content

Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce a reduced viscosity oil from lignocellulose

Overview of attention for article published in Biotechnology for Biofuels, March 2017
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
25 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce a reduced viscosity oil from lignocellulose
Published in
Biotechnology for Biofuels, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13068-017-0751-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tam N. T. Tran, Rebecca J. Breuer, Ragothaman Avanasi Narasimhan, Lucas S. Parreiras, Yaoping Zhang, Trey K. Sato, Timothy P. Durrett

Abstract

Acetyl-triacylglycerols (acetyl-TAGs) are unusual triacylglycerol (TAG) molecules that contain an sn-3 acetate group. Compared to typical triacylglycerol molecules (here referred to as long chain TAGs; lcTAGs), acetyl-TAGs possess reduced viscosity and improved cold temperature properties, which may allow direct use as a drop-in diesel fuel. Their different chemical and physical properties also make acetyl-TAGs useful for other applications such as lubricants and plasticizers. Acetyl-TAGs can be synthesized by EaDAcT, a diacylglycerol acetyltransferase enzyme originally isolated from Euonymus alatus (Burning Bush). The heterologous expression of EaDAcT in different organisms, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, resulted in the accumulation of acetyl-TAGs in storage lipids. Microbial conversion of lignocellulose into acetyl-TAGs could allow biorefinery production of versatile molecules for biofuel and bioproducts. In order to produce acetyl-TAGs from abundant lignocellulose feedstocks, we expressed EaDAcT in S. cerevisiae previously engineered to utilize xylose as a carbon source. The resulting strains were capable of producing acetyl-TAGs when grown on different media. The highest levels of acetyl-TAG production were observed with growth on synthetic lab media containing glucose or xylose. Importantly, acetyl-TAGs were also synthesized by this strain in ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX)-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH) at higher volumetric titers than previously published strains. The deletion of the four endogenous enzymes known to contribute to lcTAG production increased the proportion of acetyl-TAGs in the total storage lipids beyond that in existing strains, which will make purification of these useful lipids easier. Surprisingly, the strains containing the four deletions were still capable of synthesizing lcTAG, suggesting that the particular strain used in this study possesses additional undetermined diacylglycerol acyltransferase activity. Additionally, the carbon source used for growth influenced the accumulation of these residual lcTAGs, with higher levels in strains cultured on xylose containing media. Our results demonstrate that S. cerevisiae can be metabolically engineered to produce acetyl-TAGs when grown on different carbon sources, including hydrolysate derived from lignocellulose. Deletion of four endogenous acyltransferases enabled a higher purity of acetyl-TAGs to be achieved, but lcTAGs were still synthesized. Longer incubation times also decreased the levels of acetyl-TAGs produced. Therefore, additional work is needed to further manipulate acetyl-TAG production in this strain of S. cerevisiae, including the identification of other TAG biosynthetic and lipolytic enzymes and a better understanding of the regulation of the synthesis and degradation of storage lipids.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 40%
Student > Master 5 20%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 8%
Researcher 2 8%
Student > Bachelor 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 3 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 40%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 24%
Environmental Science 1 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 4%
Materials Science 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 March 2017.
All research outputs
#11,468,465
of 12,902,716 outputs
Outputs from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#835
of 985 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#220,630
of 257,869 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#36
of 36 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,902,716 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 985 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,869 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 36 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.