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Cerebral Cortex Regions Selectively Vulnerable to Radiation Dose-Dependent Atrophy

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

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10 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
49 Mendeley
Title
Cerebral Cortex Regions Selectively Vulnerable to Radiation Dose-Dependent Atrophy
Published in
International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, April 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2017.01.005
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tyler M. Seibert, Roshan Karunamuni, Samar Kaifi, Jeffrey Burkeen, Michael Connor, Anitha Priya Krishnan, Nathan S. White, Nikdokht Farid, Hauke Bartsch, Vyacheslav Murzin, Tanya T. Nguyen, Vitali Moiseenko, James B. Brewer, Carrie R. McDonald, Anders M. Dale, Jona A. Hattangadi-Gluth

Abstract

Neurologic deficits after brain radiation therapy (RT) typically involve decline in higher-order cognitive functions such as attention and memory rather than sensory defects or paralysis. We sought to determine whether areas of the cortex critical to cognition are selectively vulnerable to radiation dose-dependent atrophy. We measured change in cortical thickness in 54 primary brain tumor patients who underwent fractionated, partial brain RT. The study patients underwent high-resolution, volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (T1-weighted; T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, FLAIR) before RT and 1 year afterward. Semiautomated software was used to segment anatomic regions of the cerebral cortex for each patient. Cortical thickness was measured for each region before RT and 1 year afterward. Two higher-order cortical regions of interest (ROIs) were tested for association between radiation dose and cortical thinning: entorhinal (memory) and inferior parietal (attention/memory). For comparison, 2 primary cortex ROIs were also tested: pericalcarine (vision) and paracentral lobule (somatosensory/motor). Linear mixed-effects analyses were used to test all other cortical regions for significant radiation dose-dependent thickness change. Statistical significance was set at α = 0.05 using 2-tailed tests. Cortical atrophy was significantly associated with radiation dose in the entorhinal (P=.01) and inferior parietal ROIs (P=.02). By contrast, no significant radiation dose-dependent effect was found in the primary cortex ROIs (pericalcarine and paracentral lobule). In the whole-cortex analysis, 9 regions showed significant radiation dose-dependent atrophy, including areas responsible for memory, attention, and executive function (P≤.002). Areas of cerebral cortex important for higher-order cognition may be most vulnerable to radiation-related atrophy. This is consistent with clinical observations that brain radiation patients experience deficits in domains of memory, executive function, and attention. Correlations of regional cortical atrophy with domain-specific cognitive functioning in prospective trials are warranted.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 2%
Unknown 48 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 27%
Researcher 9 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 12%
Unspecified 5 10%
Other 5 10%
Other 11 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 35%
Unspecified 12 24%
Neuroscience 6 12%
Psychology 5 10%
Physics and Astronomy 3 6%
Other 6 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 September 2017.
All research outputs
#3,432,528
of 12,827,217 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics
#1,453
of 5,977 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#84,569
of 257,439 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics
#34
of 137 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,827,217 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,977 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,439 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 137 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.