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Network modularity reveals critical scales for connectivity in ecology and evolution

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, October 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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63 Dimensions

Readers on

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251 Mendeley
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Title
Network modularity reveals critical scales for connectivity in ecology and evolution
Published in
Nature Communications, October 2013
DOI 10.1038/ncomms3572
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert J. Fletcher, Andre Revell, Brian E. Reichert, Wiley M. Kitchens, Jeremy D. Dixon, James D. Austin

Abstract

For nearly a century, biologists have emphasized the profound importance of spatial scale for ecology, evolution and conservation. Nonetheless, objectively identifying critical scales has proven incredibly challenging. Here we extend new techniques from physics and social sciences that estimate modularity on networks to identify critical scales for movement and gene flow in animals. Using four species that vary widely in dispersal ability and include both mark-recapture and population genetic data, we identify significant modularity in three species, two of which cannot be explained by geographic distance alone. Importantly, the inclusion of modularity in connectivity and population viability assessments alters conclusions regarding patch importance to connectivity and suggests higher metapopulation viability than when ignoring this hidden spatial scale. We argue that network modularity reveals critical meso-scales that are probably common in populations, providing a powerful means of identifying fundamental scales for biology and for conservation strategies aimed at recovering imperilled species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 251 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 3%
Brazil 3 1%
Canada 2 <1%
Sweden 2 <1%
Australia 2 <1%
Mexico 2 <1%
India 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Other 4 2%
Unknown 226 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 68 27%
Researcher 56 22%
Student > Master 22 9%
Student > Bachelor 17 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 6%
Other 53 21%
Unknown 19 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 123 49%
Environmental Science 52 21%
Mathematics 6 2%
Computer Science 6 2%
Physics and Astronomy 5 2%
Other 18 7%
Unknown 41 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 October 2013.
All research outputs
#7,285,439
of 12,918,691 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#17,611
of 22,180 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,865
of 164,471 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#407
of 541 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,918,691 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 22,180 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 47.1. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 164,471 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 541 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.