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Uptake and Disposition of Select Pharmaceuticals by Bluegill Exposed at Constant Concentrations in a Flow-Through Aquatic Exposure System

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, March 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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35 Mendeley
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Title
Uptake and Disposition of Select Pharmaceuticals by Bluegill Exposed at Constant Concentrations in a Flow-Through Aquatic Exposure System
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, March 2017
DOI 10.1021/acs.est.7b00604
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jian-Liang Zhao, Edward T. Furlong, Heiko L. Schoenfuss, Dana W. Kolpin, Kyle L. Bird, David J. Feifarek, Eric A. Schwab, Guang-Guo Ying

Abstract

The increasing use of pharmaceuticals has led to their subsequent input into and release from wastewater treatment plants, with corresponding discharge into surface waters that may subsequently exert adverse effects upon aquatic organisms. Although the distribution of pharmaceuticals in surface water has been extensively studied, the details of uptake, internal distribution, and kinetic processing of pharmaceuticals in exposed fish have received less attention. For this research, we investigated the uptake, disposition, and toxicokinetics of five pharmaceuticals (diclofenac, methocarbamol, rosuvastatin, sulfamethoxazole, and temazepam) in bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations (1,000-4,000 ng L-1) in a flow-through exposure system. Temazepam and methocarbamol were consistently detected in bluegill biological samples with the highest concentrations in bile of 4, 940 and 180 ng g-1, respectively, while sulfamethoxazole, diclofenac, and rosuvastatin were only infrequently detected. Over 30-day exposures, the relative magnitude of mean concentrations of temazepam and methocarbamol in biological samples generally followed the order: bile ≫ gut > liver and brain > muscle, plasma, and gill. Ranges of bioconcentration factors (BCFs) in different biological samples were 0.71-3,959 and 0.13-48.6 for temazepam and methocarbamol, respectively. Log BCFs were statistically positively correlated to pH adjusted log Kow (that is, log Dow), with the strongest relations for liver and brain (r2 = 0.92 and 0.99, respectively), implying that bioconcentration patterns of ionizable pharmaceuticals depend on molecular status, that is, whether a pharmaceutical is unionized or ionized at ambient tissue pH. Methocarbamol and temazepam underwent rapid uptake and elimination in bluegill biological compartments with uptake rate constants (Ku) and elimination rate constants (Ke) at 0.0066-0.0330 h-1 and 0.0075-0.0384 h-1, respectively, and half-lives at 18.1-92.4 h. Exposure to mixtures of diclofenac, methocarbamol, sulfamethoxazole, and temazepam had little or no influence on the uptake and elimination rates, suggesting independent multiple uptake and disposition behaviors of pharmaceuticals by fish would occur when exposed to effluent-influenced surface waters.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 35 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 9 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 14%
Professor 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Other 11 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 14 40%
Environmental Science 8 23%
Chemistry 4 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 6%
Other 4 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 April 2017.
All research outputs
#1,307,227
of 12,920,516 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#1,814
of 12,990 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,022
of 257,441 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#54
of 236 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,920,516 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,990 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,441 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 236 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.