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Association between smoking and the risk of acute mountain sickness: a meta-analysis of observational studies

Overview of attention for article published in Military Medical Research, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#35 of 200)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

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8 Mendeley
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Title
Association between smoking and the risk of acute mountain sickness: a meta-analysis of observational studies
Published in
Military Medical Research, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40779-016-0108-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chen Xu, Hong-Xiang Lu, Yu-Xiao Wang, Yu Chen, Sheng-hong Yang, Yong-Jun Luo

Abstract

People rapidly ascending to high altitudes (>2500 m) may suffer from acute mountain sickness (AMS). The association between smoking and AMS risk remains unclear. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the association between smoking and AMS risk. The association between smoking and AMS risk was determined according to predefined criteria established by our team. Meta-analysis was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines. We included all relevant studies listed in the PubMed and Embase databases as of September 2015 in this meta-analysis and performed systemic searches using the terms "smoking", "acute mountain sickness" and "risk factor". The included studies were required to provide clear explanations regarding their definitions of smoking, the final altitudes reached by their participants and the diagnostic criteria used to diagnose AMS. Odds ratios (ORs) were used to evaluate the association between smoking and AMS risk across the studies, and the Q statistic was used to test OR heterogeneity, which was considered significant when P < 0.05. We also computed 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Data extracted from the articles were analyzed with Review Manager 5.3 (Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK). We used seven case-control studies including 694 smoking patients and 1986 non-smoking controls to analyze the association between smoking and AMS risk. We observed a significant association between AMS and smoking (OR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.52-0.96, P = 0.03). We determined that smoking may protect against AMS development. However, we do not advise smoking to prevent AMS. More studies are necessary to confirm the role of smoking in AMS risk.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 38%
Student > Master 1 13%
Student > Bachelor 1 13%
Other 1 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 13%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 38%
Decision Sciences 1 13%
Social Sciences 1 13%
Computer Science 1 13%
Unknown 2 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 May 2020.
All research outputs
#4,581,016
of 15,606,134 outputs
Outputs from Military Medical Research
#35
of 200 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,759
of 265,713 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Military Medical Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,606,134 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 200 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,713 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them