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A Robust, Simple Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS) Approach for High Diversity Species

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, May 2011
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
4 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
13 tweeters
patent
9 patents
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Readers on

mendeley
2688 Mendeley
citeulike
12 CiteULike
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Title
A Robust, Simple Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS) Approach for High Diversity Species
Published in
PLoS ONE, May 2011
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0019379
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert J. Elshire, Jeffrey C. Glaubitz, Qi Sun, Jesse A. Poland, Ken Kawamoto, Edward S. Buckler, Sharon E. Mitchell, Elshire RJ, Glaubitz JC, Sun Q, Poland JA, Kawamoto K, Buckler ES, Mitchell SE

Abstract

Advances in next generation technologies have driven the costs of DNA sequencing down to the point that genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) is now feasible for high diversity, large genome species. Here, we report a procedure for constructing GBS libraries based on reducing genome complexity with restriction enzymes (REs). This approach is simple, quick, extremely specific, highly reproducible, and may reach important regions of the genome that are inaccessible to sequence capture approaches. By using methylation-sensitive REs, repetitive regions of genomes can be avoided and lower copy regions targeted with two to three fold higher efficiency. This tremendously simplifies computationally challenging alignment problems in species with high levels of genetic diversity. The GBS procedure is demonstrated with maize (IBM) and barley (Oregon Wolfe Barley) recombinant inbred populations where roughly 200,000 and 25,000 sequence tags were mapped, respectively. An advantage in species like barley that lack a complete genome sequence is that a reference map need only be developed around the restriction sites, and this can be done in the process of sample genotyping. In such cases, the consensus of the read clusters across the sequence tagged sites becomes the reference. Alternatively, for kinship analyses in the absence of a reference genome, the sequence tags can simply be treated as dominant markers. Future application of GBS to breeding, conservation, and global species and population surveys may allow plant breeders to conduct genomic selection on a novel germplasm or species without first having to develop any prior molecular tools, or conservation biologists to determine population structure without prior knowledge of the genome or diversity in the species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 2,688 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 75 3%
Brazil 43 2%
Germany 18 <1%
Mexico 15 <1%
Colombia 13 <1%
Canada 11 <1%
Australia 10 <1%
Italy 8 <1%
Spain 8 <1%
Other 103 4%
Unknown 2384 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 790 29%
Researcher 652 24%
Student > Master 455 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 155 6%
Student > Bachelor 154 6%
Other 482 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2220 83%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 200 7%
Unspecified 95 4%
Environmental Science 59 2%
Computer Science 30 1%
Other 84 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 52. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 April 2018.
All research outputs
#227,011
of 9,752,760 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#5,060
of 124,041 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#222,229
of 9,109,469 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#5,035
of 120,120 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,752,760 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 124,041 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 9,109,469 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 120,120 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.