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Biodiversity redistribution under climate change: Impacts on ecosystems and human well-being

Overview of attention for article published in Science, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Citations

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478 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
1990 Mendeley
Title
Biodiversity redistribution under climate change: Impacts on ecosystems and human well-being
Published in
Science, March 2017
DOI 10.1126/science.aai9214
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gretta T. Pecl, Miguel B. Araújo, Johann D. Bell, Julia Blanchard, Timothy C. Bonebrake, I-Ching Chen, Timothy D. Clark, Robert K. Colwell, Finn Danielsen, Birgitta Evengård, Lorena Falconi, Simon Ferrier, Stewart Frusher, Raquel A. Garcia, Roger B. Griffis, Alistair J. Hobday, Charlene Janion-Scheepers, Marta A. Jarzyna, Sarah Jennings, Jonathan Lenoir, Hlif I. Linnetved, Victoria Y. Martin, Phillipa C. McCormack, Jan McDonald, Nicola J. Mitchell, Tero Mustonen, John M. Pandolfi, Nathalie Pettorelli, Ekaterina Popova, Sharon A. Robinson, Brett R. Scheffers, Justine D. Shaw, Cascade J. B. Sorte, Jan M. Strugnell, Jennifer M. Sunday, Mao-Ning Tuanmu, Adriana Vergés, Cecilia Villanueva, Thomas Wernberg, Erik Wapstra, Stephen E. Williams

Abstract

Distributions of Earth's species are changing at accelerating rates, increasingly driven by human-mediated climate change. Such changes are already altering the composition of ecological communities, but beyond conservation of natural systems, how and why does this matter? We review evidence that climate-driven species redistribution at regional to global scales affects ecosystem functioning, human well-being, and the dynamics of climate change itself. Production of natural resources required for food security, patterns of disease transmission, and processes of carbon sequestration are all altered by changes in species distribution. Consideration of these effects of biodiversity redistribution is critical yet lacking in most mitigation and adaptation strategies, including the United Nation's Sustainable Development Goals.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 1,455 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,990 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 8 <1%
Spain 7 <1%
Brazil 6 <1%
United Kingdom 6 <1%
France 4 <1%
Finland 3 <1%
Colombia 3 <1%
Sweden 3 <1%
South Africa 3 <1%
Other 16 <1%
Unknown 1931 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 428 22%
Researcher 368 18%
Student > Master 333 17%
Student > Bachelor 232 12%
Other 92 5%
Other 317 16%
Unknown 220 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 736 37%
Environmental Science 570 29%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 99 5%
Social Sciences 57 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 53 3%
Other 139 7%
Unknown 336 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1408. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 November 2019.
All research outputs
#2,008
of 14,029,034 outputs
Outputs from Science
#159
of 63,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#117
of 262,884 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science
#13
of 978 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,029,034 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 63,487 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 45.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,884 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 978 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.