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Varicella vaccination in Europe – taking the practical approach

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, May 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
97 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
126 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Varicella vaccination in Europe – taking the practical approach
Published in
BMC Medicine, May 2009
DOI 10.1186/1741-7015-7-26
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paolo Bonanni, Judith Breuer, Anne Gershon, Michael Gershon, Waleria Hryniewicz, Vana Papaevangelou, Bernard Rentier, Hans Rümke, Catherine Sadzot-Delvaux, Jacques Senterre, Catherine Weil-Olivier, Peter Wutzler

Abstract

Varicella is a common viral disease affecting almost the entire birth cohort. Although usually self-limiting, some cases of varicella can be serious, with 2 to 6% of cases attending a general practice resulting in complications. The hospitalisation rate for varicella in Europe ranges from 1.3 to 4.5 per 100,000 population/year and up to 10.1% of hospitalised patients report permanent or possible permanent sequelae (for example, scarring or ataxia). However, in many countries the epidemiology of varicella remains largely unknown or incomplete. In countries where routine childhood vaccination against varicella has been implemented, it has had a positive effect on disease prevention and control. Furthermore, mathematical models indicate that this intervention strategy may provide economic benefits for the individual and society. Despite this evidence and recommendations for varicella vaccination by official bodies such as the World Health Organization, and scientific experts in the field, the majority of European countries (with the exception of Germany and Greece) have delayed decisions on implementation of routine childhood varicella vaccination, choosing instead to vaccinate high-risk groups or not to vaccinate at all. In this paper, members of the Working Against Varicella in Europe group consider the practicalities of introducing routine childhood varicella vaccination in Europe, discussing the benefits and challenges of different vaccination options (vaccination vs. no vaccination, routine vaccination of infants vs. vaccination of susceptible adolescents or adults, two doses vs. one dose of varicella vaccine, monovalent varicella vaccines vs. tetravalent measles, mumps, rubella and varicella vaccines, as well as the optimal interval between two doses of measles, mumps, rubella and varicella vaccines). Assessment of the epidemiology of varicella in Europe and evidence for the effectiveness of varicella vaccination provides support for routine childhood programmes in Europe. Although European countries are faced with challenges or uncertainties that may have delayed implementation of a childhood vaccination programme, many of these concerns remain hypothetical and with new opportunities offered by combined measles, mumps, rubella and varicella vaccines, reassessment may be timely.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 126 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 1 <1%
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 121 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 35 28%
Researcher 21 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 13%
Student > Bachelor 11 9%
Student > Postgraduate 10 8%
Other 24 19%
Unknown 9 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 61 48%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 13%
Social Sciences 8 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 3%
Other 18 14%
Unknown 14 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 April 2020.
All research outputs
#3,131,156
of 15,942,359 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#1,623
of 2,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,965,611
of 14,933,031 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#1,623
of 2,486 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,942,359 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,487 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 37.3. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 14,933,031 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,486 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.