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Does pain take holidays? Non-attendance rates at a hospital-based pain clinic are elevated during the Jewish high-holidays

Overview of attention for article published in Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, March 2017
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Title
Does pain take holidays? Non-attendance rates at a hospital-based pain clinic are elevated during the Jewish high-holidays
Published in
Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13584-017-0132-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Motti Ratmansky, Nitzan Hai, Tzion Schlossberg, Aviva Mimouni-Bloch, Avraham Schweiger

Abstract

Patient non-attendance is an expensive and persistent problem worldwide with rates between 5-39% reported in the literature. The objective of the study was to assess whether there is a higher incidence of non-attendance in a hospital-based pain clinic during the period of the Jewish High Holidays (Rosh-Hashanah to Sukkot) and whether this is further compounded by other factors, such as demographic characteristics and previous visits to the clinic. Records were taken from the Lowenstein Rehabilitation Hospital appointment scheduling system. Data was gathered from two time-periods: High-Holidays and Control for each year, over a total of 6 years 2008-2013. Non-attendance was analyzed by period, by age, by gender and by previous visits to the clinic. In the entire population studied (666 distinct records), the non-attendance rate was higher during the High-Holidays as compared to the Control period (32 vs. 24.1%; p = 0.030). Non-attendance rates were significantly higher during the Holidays among repeating patients (28.6 vs. 14.8%; p = 0.002) and among women (34.6 vs. 20.7%; p = 0.004). Our data suggest that non-attendance is elevated during the High-Holidays in specific groups of patients, namely, repeating patients and women. Despite no direct inquiry into the reasons for non-attendance, we speculate that the elevated well-being and familial support during the holidays contribute to the patients' ability to cope with persistent pain and possibly directly reduce the amount of pain, leading to patients missing their pain clinic appointments. Our results, provided they can be corroborated by larger-scale studies, can assist in scheduling policy adjustments such as avoidance of appointments during the High-holidays for specific patient populations and more rigorous reminder efforts during these times of the year that may lead to reduction in overall non-attendance rates in the pain clinic. Further, our data provide an impetus for further studies of non-attendance patterns among pain clinic patients, in order to acquire a better understanding of the reasons for non-attendance and develop strategies to reduce it and thus contribute to the continuous improvement of the Israeli health systems as well as others worldwide.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 6%
Unknown 16 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 29%
Student > Bachelor 3 18%
Other 1 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 6%
Researcher 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 12%
Psychology 1 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Social Sciences 1 6%
Other 2 12%
Unknown 9 53%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 March 2017.
All research outputs
#8,036,474
of 9,272,034 outputs
Outputs from Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
#192
of 258 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#219,565
of 260,732 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
#12
of 19 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 258 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.