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Hypotheses for mechanisms linking shiftwork and cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Medical Hypotheses, September 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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102 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
118 Mendeley
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Title
Hypotheses for mechanisms linking shiftwork and cancer
Published in
Medical Hypotheses, September 2011
DOI 10.1016/j.mehy.2011.06.002
Pubmed ID
Authors

L. Fritschi, D.C. Glass, J.S. Heyworth, K. Aronson, J. Girschik, T. Boyle, A. Grundy, T.C. Erren

Abstract

Shift work has been associated with various adverse health outcomes. In particular, there has been a recent flourish in investigating potential cancer risk associated with working night shifts and other shift schedules. Epidemiologic studies have revealed generally weak associations due to several methodological challenges such as lack of standard classifications of shift or night work. The field also has been hindered by a lack of clarity about the possible mechanisms by which shiftwork could have an effect on cancer risk. One possible mechanism is reduced production of melatonin caused by exposure to light at night. Although there is a growing body of evidence that provides some support for this mechanism, several other mechanisms also make sense from a biological point of view. Further, the relatively weak magnitude of the associations between light at night and melatonin level suggests that multiple factors may be operating along the pathway between shift work and adverse health consequences (including cancer risk). Here we propose four additional mechanisms that should be considered for a comprehensive investigation of these potential pathways. These are: phase shift; sleep disruption; lifestyle factors (such as poor quality diets, less physical activity and higher BMI); and lower vitamin D. Consideration of all these mechanisms is necessary in order to design effective preventative workplace strategies. In developed countries, approximately 20% of the population undertake shiftwork and, while we are unlikely to be able to eliminate shiftwork from current work practices, there are aspects of shiftwork that can be modified and there may be facets of individual susceptibility that we may be able to identify and target for prevention.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 118 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 2%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 110 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 29 25%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 13%
Student > Master 14 12%
Researcher 12 10%
Student > Bachelor 11 9%
Other 37 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 30 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 20%
Unspecified 17 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 6%
Other 30 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 February 2012.
All research outputs
#2,487,952
of 13,540,139 outputs
Outputs from Medical Hypotheses
#713
of 3,130 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,390,223
of 12,876,445 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Medical Hypotheses
#713
of 3,130 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,540,139 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,130 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 12,876,445 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,130 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.