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Arabidopsis Coordinates the Diurnal Regulation of Carbon Allocation and Growth across a Wide Range of Photoperiods

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Plant, January 2014
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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108 Dimensions

Readers on

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156 Mendeley
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Title
Arabidopsis Coordinates the Diurnal Regulation of Carbon Allocation and Growth across a Wide Range of Photoperiods
Published in
Molecular Plant, January 2014
DOI 10.1093/mp/sst127
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ronan Sulpice, Anna Flis, Alexander A. Ivakov, Federico Apelt, Nicole Krohn, Beatrice Encke, Christin Abel, Regina Feil, John E. Lunn, Mark Stitt

Abstract

In short photoperiods, plants accumulate starch more rapidly in the light and degrade it more slowly at night, ensuring that their starch reserves last until dawn. To investigate the accompanying changes in the timing of growth, Arabidopsis was grown in a range of photoperiods and analyzed for rosette biomass, photosynthesis, respiration, ribosome abundance, polysome loading, starch, and over 40 metabolites at dawn and dusk. The data set was used to model growth rates in the daytime and night, and to identify metabolites that correlate with growth. Modeled growth rates and polysome loading were high in the daytime and at night in long photoperiods, but decreased at night in short photoperiods. Ribosome abundance was similar in all photoperiods. It is discussed how the amount of starch accumulated in the light period, the length of the night, and maintenance costs interact to constrain growth at night in short photoperiods, and alter the strategy for optimizing ribosome use. Significant correlations were found in the daytime and the night between growth rates and the levels of the sugar-signal trehalose 6-phosphate and the amino acid biosynthesis intermediate shikimate, identifying these metabolites as hubs in a network that coordinates growth with diurnal changes in the carbon supply.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 156 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 150 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 43 28%
Researcher 28 18%
Student > Master 23 15%
Student > Bachelor 12 8%
Professor 9 6%
Other 41 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 103 66%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 31 20%
Unspecified 13 8%
Environmental Science 4 3%
Engineering 2 1%
Other 3 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 October 2013.
All research outputs
#6,653,129
of 12,028,453 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Plant
#302
of 691 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#67,400
of 160,360 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Plant
#6
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,028,453 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 691 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 160,360 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.