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Sex-specific Relationship of Serum Uric Acid with All-cause Mortality in Adults with Normal Kidney Function: An Observational Study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Rheumatology, January 2017
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3 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

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5 Mendeley
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Title
Sex-specific Relationship of Serum Uric Acid with All-cause Mortality in Adults with Normal Kidney Function: An Observational Study
Published in
Journal of Rheumatology, January 2017
DOI 10.3899/jrheum.160792
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eunjeong Kang, Seung-sik Hwang, Dong Ki Kim, Kook-Hwan Oh, Kwon Wook Joo, Yon Su Kim, Hajeong Lee

Abstract

To explain the clinical effect of serum uric acid (SUA) levels as a risk factor for mortality, considering exclusion of kidney function. Participants aged over 40 years who underwent health checkups were recruited. Individuals with estimated glomerular filtrations rates < 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) and who received laboratory study and colonoscopy on the same day were excluded. SUA levels were higher in men than in women (5.7 ± 1.2 mg/dl for men and 4.2 ± 0.9 mg/dl for women, p < 0.001). During 12.3 ± 3.6 years of followup, 1402 deaths occurred among 27,490 participants. About 6.9% of men and 3.1% of women died. The overall mortality rate had a U-shaped association with SUA levels, a U-shaped association in men, and no association in women. There was a significant interaction of sex for the SUA-mortality association (p for interaction = 0.049); therefore, survival analysis was conducted by sex. In men, the lower SUA group had a higher mortality rate after adjustment (SUA ≤ 4.0 mg/dl, adjusted HR 1.413, 95% CI 1.158-1.724, p = 0.001) compared with the reference group (SUA 4.1-6.0 mg/dl). A higher SUA contributed to an insignificant increased mortality in men (> 8.0 mg/dl, adjusted HR 1.140, 95% CI 0.794-1.636, p = 0.479). Women failed to show any significant association between SUA and mortality. This study provided novel evidence that SUA-mortality association differed by sex. We demonstrated that a lower SUA was an independent risk factor for all-cause mortality in men with normal kidney function.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 5 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Korea, Republic of 1 20%
Unknown 4 80%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor > Associate Professor 2 40%
Student > Master 1 20%
Student > Bachelor 1 20%
Unspecified 1 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 60%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 20%
Unspecified 1 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 March 2019.
All research outputs
#7,560,330
of 13,116,247 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Rheumatology
#1,277
of 2,270 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#129,428
of 261,759 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Rheumatology
#25
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,116,247 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,270 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,759 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.