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Risk Factors Associated with Miscarriage and Impaired Fecundity among United States Servicewomen during the Recent Conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan

Overview of attention for article published in Women's Health Issues, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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18 Mendeley
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Title
Risk Factors Associated with Miscarriage and Impaired Fecundity among United States Servicewomen during the Recent Conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan
Published in
Women's Health Issues, May 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.whi.2016.12.012
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrea C. Ippolito, Amber D. Seelig, Teresa M. Powell, Ava Marie S. Conlin, Nancy F. Crum-Cianflone, Hector Lemus, Carter J. Sevick, Cynthia A. LeardMann

Abstract

Research on the reproductive health of U.S. servicewomen deployed in support of the recent operations in Iraq and Afghanistan is sparse. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether military experiences, including combat deployment, deployment length, and life stressors during the recent conflicts, were associated with increased odds for miscarriage or impaired fecundity among U.S. servicewomen. We used data from the Millennium Cohort Study, a large longitudinal military study that began in 2001 and includes military personnel from all service branches, including active duty and Reserve/National Guard personnel. Participants for this study included women aged 18 to 45 years who had completed two questionnaires (2004-2006 and 2007-2008). Separate multivariable logistic regression models were performed to estimate the odds of reporting miscarriage and impaired fecundity by military experiences that adjusted for covariates. Subanalyses were conducted using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes found in the Military Health System Data Repository for both outcomes among servicewomen on active duty. Overall, 31% and 11% of military servicewomen reported miscarriage and impaired fecundity, respectively, during the approximate 3-year follow-up period. After adjusting for demographic, behavioral, and military characteristics, deployment experiences and life stressors were not associated with miscarriage or perceived impaired fecundity. Subanalyses using medical record data confirmed these results. Overall, these results suggest that military deployments do not increase risk for miscarriage and impaired fecundity among U.S. servicewomen. However, because the point estimates for many of the exposures were elevated, more research is needed to better understand the potential risks associated with environmental exposures and specific types of combat exposures.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 28%
Student > Master 5 28%
Lecturer 2 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 11%
Student > Bachelor 1 6%
Other 3 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 5 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 22%
Social Sciences 2 11%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 6%
Other 2 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 December 2018.
All research outputs
#2,197,812
of 12,651,470 outputs
Outputs from Women's Health Issues
#212
of 712 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,013
of 257,645 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Women's Health Issues
#10
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,651,470 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 712 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,645 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.