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Measuring the physical and economic impact of filarial lymphoedema in Chikwawa district, Malawi: a case-control study

Overview of attention for article published in Infectious Diseases of Poverty, April 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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15 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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37 Mendeley
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Title
Measuring the physical and economic impact of filarial lymphoedema in Chikwawa district, Malawi: a case-control study
Published in
Infectious Diseases of Poverty, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40249-017-0241-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michelle C. Stanton, Masato Yamauchi, Square Z. Mkwanda, Paul Ndhlovu, Dorothy Emmie Matipula, Charles Mackenzie, Louise A. Kelly-Hope

Abstract

Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is one of the primary causes of lymphoedema in sub-Saharan Africa, and has a significant impact on the quality of life (QoL) of those affected. In this paper we assess the relative impact of lymphoedema on mobility and income in Chikwawa district, Malawi. A random sample of 31 people with lymphoedema and 31 matched controls completed a QoL questionnaire from which both an overall and a mobility-specific score were calculated. Two mobility tests were undertaken, namely the 10 m walking test [10MWT] and timed up and go [TUG] test, and a subset of 10 cases-control pairs wore GPS data loggers for 3 weeks to measure their mobility in a more natural setting. Retrospective economic data was collected from all 31 case-control pairs, and each participant undertaking the GPS activity recorded daily earnings and health expenditure throughout the observation period. Cases had a significantly poorer overall QoL (cases = 32.2, controls = 6.0, P < 0.01) and mobility-specific (cases = 43.1, controls = 7.4, P < 0.01) scores in comparison to controls. Cases were also significantly slower (P < 0.01) at completing the timed mobility tests, e.g. mean 10MWT speed of 0.83 m/s in comparison to 1.10 m/s for controls. An inconsistent relationship was observed between mobility-specific QoL scores and the timed test results for cases (10MWT correlation = -0.06, 95% CI = (-0.41, 0.30)), indicating that their perceived disability differed from their measured disability, whereas the results were consistent for controls (10MWT correlation = -0.61, 95% CI = (-0.79, -0.34)). GPS summaries indicated that cases generally walk shorter distances at slower speeds than control, covering a smaller geographical area (median area by kernel smoothing: cases = 1.25 km(2), controls = 2.10 km(2), P = 0.16). Cases reported earning less than half that earned by controls per week (cases = $0.70, controls = $1.86, P = 0.064), with a smaller proportion of their earnings (16% vs 22%, P = 0.461) being spent on healthcare. Those affected by lymphoedema are at a clear disadvantage to their unaffected peers, experiencing a lower QoL as confirmed by both subjective and objective mobility measures, and lower income. This study also indicates that objective measures of mobility may be a useful supplement to self-assessed QoL questionnaires when assessing the future impact of lymphoedema management interventions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 1 3%
Unknown 36 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 22%
Student > Master 6 16%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Unspecified 4 11%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Other 12 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 27%
Unspecified 8 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 8%
Other 9 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 May 2017.
All research outputs
#1,927,363
of 13,740,405 outputs
Outputs from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#64
of 483 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52,730
of 262,210 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#2
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,740,405 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 483 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,210 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.