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Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches to Identifying Migration Chronology in a Continental Migrant

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, October 2013
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Title
Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches to Identifying Migration Chronology in a Continental Migrant
Published in
PLOS ONE, October 2013
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0075673
Pubmed ID
Authors

William S. Beatty, Dylan C. Kesler, Elisabeth B. Webb, Andrew H. Raedeke, Luke W. Naylor, Dale D. Humburg

Abstract

The degree to which extrinsic factors influence migration chronology in North American waterfowl has not been quantified, particularly for dabbling ducks. Previous studies have examined waterfowl migration using various methods, however, quantitative approaches to define avian migration chronology over broad spatio-temporal scales are limited, and the implications for using different approaches have not been assessed. We used movement data from 19 female adult mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) equipped with solar-powered global positioning system satellite transmitters to evaluate two individual level approaches for quantifying migration chronology. The first approach defined migration based on individual movements among geopolitical boundaries (state, provincial, international), whereas the second method modeled net displacement as a function of time using nonlinear models. Differences in migration chronologies identified by each of the approaches were examined with analysis of variance. The geopolitical method identified mean autumn migration midpoints at 15 November 2010 and 13 November 2011, whereas the net displacement method identified midpoints at 15 November 2010 and 14 November 2011. The mean midpoints for spring migration were 3 April 2011 and 20 March 2012 using the geopolitical method and 31 March 2011 and 22 March 2012 using the net displacement method. The duration, initiation date, midpoint, and termination date for both autumn and spring migration did not differ between the two individual level approaches. Although we did not detect differences in migration parameters between the different approaches, the net displacement metric offers broad potential to address questions in movement ecology for migrating species. Ultimately, an objective definition of migration chronology will allow researchers to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the extrinsic factors that drive migration at the individual and population levels. As a result, targeted conservation plans can be developed to support planning for habitat management and evaluation of long-term climate effects.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
Germany 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 68 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 20 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 18%
Researcher 10 14%
Other 6 8%
Student > Bachelor 5 7%
Other 9 13%
Unknown 9 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 39 54%
Environmental Science 19 26%
Social Sciences 3 4%
Psychology 1 1%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 1%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 7 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 October 2013.
All research outputs
#7,556,447
of 12,091,568 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#80,083
of 133,031 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#84,131
of 163,449 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#2,492
of 4,093 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,091,568 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 133,031 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 163,449 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,093 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.