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Predictors of hair cortisol concentrations in older adults

Overview of attention for article published in Psychoneuroendocrinology, January 2014
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Title
Predictors of hair cortisol concentrations in older adults
Published in
Psychoneuroendocrinology, January 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2013.10.007
Pubmed ID
Authors

Silke Feller, Matthaeus Vigl, Manuela M. Bergmann, Heiner Boeing, Clemens Kirschbaum, Tobias Stalder

Abstract

People at older ages are at increased risk for developing stress-related diseases associated with chronically elevated cortisol secretion. However, the main factors contributing to such endocrine alterations in this age group are still largely unknown. This cross-sectional study examined patterns of long-term integrated cortisol secretion, as assessed in hair, in a sample of 654 participants in middle and old adulthood (mean age: 65.8 years; range: 47-82 years) from the German cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study in Potsdam. Hair cortisol concentrations (HCC) were determined from the first scalp-near 3 cm hair segment and several sociodemographic, lifestyle, anthropometric, disease-related, and psychological parameters were assessed. In simple linear regressions, HCC were found to increase with participants' age and to be higher in men compared to women. HCC also showed positive associations with waist-to-hip ratio, waist circumference, smoking, prevalent type 2 diabetes mellitus, mental health, daytime sleeping, and being unemployed or retired--as well as a negative association with diastolic blood pressure. After full mutual adjustment, only age and smoking remained independent predictors of HCC. The association between prevalent type 2 diabetes mellitus and HCC was attenuated but still persisted independently in women. Similar, a positive relationship between HCC and alcohol consumption was found in women. The current results confirm previous evidence of positive associations of HCC with age, sex, alcohol consumption, and type 2 diabetes mellitus and add new knowledge on factors--such as smoking--that may contribute to elevated cortisol levels in people at older ages.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 121 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Russia 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 118 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 23%
Researcher 21 17%
Student > Master 17 14%
Student > Bachelor 16 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 7%
Other 31 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 32 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 25 21%
Unspecified 18 15%
Social Sciences 9 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 7%
Other 28 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 October 2013.
All research outputs
#10,696,645
of 12,062,618 outputs
Outputs from Psychoneuroendocrinology
#2,184
of 2,498 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#132,856
of 158,428 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psychoneuroendocrinology
#33
of 51 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,062,618 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 158,428 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 51 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.