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Stress and adolescent hippocampal neurogenesis: diet and exercise as cognitive modulators

Overview of attention for article published in Translational Psychiatry, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
46 tweeters

Citations

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84 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
381 Mendeley
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Title
Stress and adolescent hippocampal neurogenesis: diet and exercise as cognitive modulators
Published in
Translational Psychiatry, April 2017
DOI 10.1038/tp.2017.48
Pubmed ID
Authors

C M Hueston, J F Cryan, Y M Nolan

Abstract

Adolescence is a critical period for brain maturation. Deciphering how disturbances to the central nervous system at this time affect structure, function and behavioural outputs is important to better understand any long-lasting effects. Hippocampal neurogenesis occurs during development and continues throughout life. In adulthood, integration of these new cells into the hippocampus is important for emotional behaviour, cognitive function and neural plasticity. During the adolescent period, maturation of the hippocampus and heightened levels of hippocampal neurogenesis are observed, making alterations to neurogenesis at this time particularly consequential. As stress negatively affects hippocampal neurogenesis, and adolescence is a particularly stressful time of life, it is important to investigate the impact of stressor exposure at this time on hippocampal neurogenesis and cognitive function. Adolescence may represent not only a time for which stress can have long-lasting effects, but is also a critical period during which interventions, such as exercise and diet, could ameliorate stress-induced changes to hippocampal function. In addition, intervention at this time may also promote life-long behavioural changes that would aid in fostering increased hippocampal neurogenesis and cognitive function. This review addresses both the acute and long-term stress-induced alterations to hippocampal neurogenesis and cognition during the adolescent period, as well as changes to the stress response and pubertal hormones at this time which may result in differential effects than are observed in adulthood. We hypothesise that adolescence may represent an optimal time for healthy lifestyle changes to have a positive and long-lasting impact on hippocampal neurogenesis, and to protect against stress-induced deficits. We conclude that future research into the mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of the adolescent hippocampus to stress, exercise and diet and the consequent effect on cognition may provide insight into why adolescence may be a vital period for correct conditioning of future hippocampal function.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 46 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 381 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 381 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 58 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 56 15%
Student > Master 55 14%
Researcher 39 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 32 8%
Other 56 15%
Unknown 85 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 86 23%
Psychology 38 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 38 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 21 6%
Other 63 17%
Unknown 109 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 40. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 November 2019.
All research outputs
#771,960
of 20,943,519 outputs
Outputs from Translational Psychiatry
#334
of 2,896 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,284
of 282,141 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Translational Psychiatry
#14
of 93 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,943,519 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,896 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,141 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 93 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.