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Transcriptome analysis of microglia in a mouse model of Rett syndrome: differential expression of genes associated with microglia/macrophage activation and cellular stress

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Autism, March 2017
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Title
Transcriptome analysis of microglia in a mouse model of Rett syndrome: differential expression of genes associated with microglia/macrophage activation and cellular stress
Published in
Molecular Autism, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13229-017-0134-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dejian Zhao, Ryan Mokhtari, Erika Pedrosa, Rayna Birnbaum, Deyou Zheng, Herbert M. Lachman

Abstract

Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe, neurodevelopmental disorder primarily affecting girls, characterized by progressive loss of cognitive, social, and motor skills after a relatively brief period of typical development. It is usually due to de novo loss of function mutations in the X-linked gene, MeCP2, which codes for the gene expression and chromatin regulator, methyl-CpG binding protein 2. Although the behavioral phenotype appears to be primarily due to neuronal Mecp2 deficiency in mice, other cell types, including astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, also appear to contribute to some aspects of the RTT phenotype. In addition, microglia may also play a role. However, the effect of Mecp2 deficiency in microglia on RTT pathogenesis is controversial. In the current study, we applied whole transcriptome analysis using RNA-seq to gain insight into molecular pathways in microglia that might be dysregulated during the transition, in female mice heterozygous for an Mecp2-null allele (Mecp2(+/-); Het), from the pre-phenotypic (5 weeks) to the phenotypic phases (24 weeks). We found a significant overlap in differentially expressed genes (DEGs) with genes involved in regulating the extracellular matrix, and those that are activated or inhibited when macrophages and microglia are stimulated towards the M1 and M2 activation states. However, the M1- and M2-associated genes were different in the 5- and 24-week samples. In addition, a substantial decrease in the expression of nine members of the heat shock protein (HSP) family was found in the 5-week samples, but not at 24 weeks. These findings suggest that microglia from pre-phenotypic and phenotypic female mice are activated in a manner different from controls and that pre-phenotypic female mice may have alterations in their capacity to response to heat stress and other stressors that function through the HSP pathway.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 26%
Unspecified 9 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 17%
Student > Master 8 17%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Other 7 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 23%
Neuroscience 11 23%
Unspecified 9 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 6%
Other 9 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 April 2017.
All research outputs
#4,778,096
of 9,541,169 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Autism
#297
of 350 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#126,265
of 261,558 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Autism
#12
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,541,169 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 350 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.9. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,558 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.