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Natural gold particles in Eucalyptus leaves and their relevance to exploration for buried gold deposits

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, October 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
47 news outlets
blogs
15 blogs
twitter
142 tweeters
facebook
39 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
20 Google+ users
reddit
3 Redditors
video
2 video uploaders

Readers on

mendeley
113 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Natural gold particles in Eucalyptus leaves and their relevance to exploration for buried gold deposits
Published in
Nature Communications, October 2013
DOI 10.1038/ncomms3614
Pubmed ID
Authors

Melvyn Lintern, Ravi Anand, Chris Ryan, David Paterson, Lintern M, Anand R, Ryan C, Paterson D

Abstract

Eucalyptus trees may translocate Au from mineral deposits and support the use of vegetation (biogeochemical) sampling in mineral exploration, particularly where thick sediments dominate. However, biogeochemistry has not been routinely adopted partly because biotic mechanisms of Au migration are poorly understood. For example, although Au has been previously measured in plant samples, there has been doubt as to whether it was truly absorbed rather than merely adsorbed on the plant surface as aeolian contamination. Here we show the first evidence of particulate Au within natural specimens of living biological tissue (not from laboratory experimentation). This observation conclusively demonstrates active biogeochemical adsorption of Au and provides insight into its behaviour in natural samples. The confirmation of biogeochemical adsorption of Au, and of a link with abiotic processes, promotes confidence in an emerging technique that may lead to future exploration success and maintain continuity of supply.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 142 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 113 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 3 3%
France 2 2%
Mexico 2 2%
Brazil 2 2%
Germany 1 <1%
Iraq 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Turkey 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Other 5 4%
Unknown 94 83%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 23%
Researcher 25 22%
Student > Master 17 15%
Student > Bachelor 12 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 10%
Other 22 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 37 33%
Environmental Science 19 17%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 15 13%
Chemistry 10 9%
Materials Science 9 8%
Other 23 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 631. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 September 2017.
All research outputs
#5,387
of 8,614,618 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#87
of 13,802 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88
of 146,914 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#1
of 363 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,614,618 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,802 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 44.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 146,914 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 363 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.