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Classification of intra-specific variation in plant functional strategies reveals adaptation to climate

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of Botany, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
11 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
51 Mendeley
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Title
Classification of intra-specific variation in plant functional strategies reveals adaptation to climate
Published in
Annals of Botany, March 2017
DOI 10.1093/aob/mcx031
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rose-Lucy May, Stuart Warner, Astrid Wingler

Abstract

In plants, extensive intra-specific variation exists in the allocation of resources between vegetative growth and reproduction, reflecting different functional strategies. A simple method for the classification of intra-specific variation in these strategies would enable characterization of evolutionary and ecological processes. C-S-R theory can be applied to classify functional strategies (competitive C; stress tolerant, S; ruderal, R) in different plant species. Using a diverse set of arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) accessions grown under common conditions, it was tested whether a simple approach designed for allocating C-S-R strategies at the species level can also be used to analyse intra-specific variation. Substantial intra-specific variation between arabidopsis accessions was found along the S-R axis. There was a positive correlation of temperature at the geographical origin with the dimension of S and a negative correlation with the dimension of R. Flowering time in a natural annual cycle and leaf dry matter content were identified as the main determinants of this adaptation, with plants originating from warmer climates having a higher leaf dry matter content and flowering earlier in a common garden. It was shown that functional strategies reflect adaptation to climate, with consequences for important traits such as fecundity and total plant dry weight. The approach could be used in genome-wide association studies to determine the genetic basis of functional strategies in wild species or crops.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 50 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 33%
Researcher 6 12%
Student > Master 5 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 8%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 8 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 45%
Environmental Science 13 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 6%
Computer Science 1 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 8 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 December 2017.
All research outputs
#1,538,565
of 15,818,351 outputs
Outputs from Annals of Botany
#547
of 2,786 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,367
of 267,304 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of Botany
#20
of 47 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,818,351 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,786 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,304 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 47 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.