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Acupuncture and assisted conception

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, January 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
17 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
55 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
34 Mendeley
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Title
Acupuncture and assisted conception
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, January 2008
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd006920.pub2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ying C Cheong, Ernest Hung Yu Ng, William L Ledger, Cheong, Ying C, Hung Yu Ng, Ernest, Ledger, William L

Abstract

Acupuncture has recently been studied in assisted reproductive treatment (ART) although its role in reproductive medicine is still debated. To determine the effectiveness of acupuncture in the outcomes of ART. All reports which describe randomised controlled trials of acupuncture in assisted conception were obtained through searches of the Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL, Ovid MEDLINE (1996 to August 2007), EMBASE (1980 to August 2007), CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature) (1982 to August 2007), AMED, National Research Register, Clinical Trials register (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the Chinese database of clinical trials. Randomised controlled trials of acupuncture for couples who were undergoing ART comparing acupuncture treatment alone or acupuncture with concurrent ART versus no treatment, placebo or sham acupuncture plus ART for the treatment of primary and secondary infertility. Women with medical illness deemed contraindications for ART or acupuncture were excluded. Sixteen randomised controlled trials were identified that involved acupuncture and assisted conception. Thirteen trials were included in the review and three were excluded. Quality assessment and data extraction were performed independently by two review authors. Meta-analysis was performed using odds ratio (OR) for dichotomous outcomes. The outcome measures were live birth rate, clinical ongoing pregnancy rate, miscarriage rate, and any reported side effects of treatment. There is evidence of benefit when acupuncture is performed on the day of embryo transfer (ET) on the live birth rate (OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.29 to 2.77) but not when it is performed two to three days after ET (OR 1.79, 95% CI 0.93 to 3.44). There is no evidence of benefit on pregnancy outcomes when acupuncture is performed around the time of oocyte retrieval. Acupuncture performed on the day of ET shows a beneficial effect on the live birth rate; however, with the present evidence this could be attributed to placebo effect and the small number of women included in the trials. Acupuncture should not be offered during the luteal phase in routine clinical practice until further evidence is available from sufficiently powered RCTs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 6%
United States 1 3%
Ireland 1 3%
Unknown 30 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 21%
Student > Master 7 21%
Student > Bachelor 5 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 9%
Other 3 9%
Other 5 15%
Unknown 4 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 62%
Computer Science 2 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Arts and Humanities 2 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 4 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 25. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 November 2013.
All research outputs
#544,199
of 12,313,335 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#1,499
of 8,406 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#530,194
of 11,693,772 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#1,474
of 8,121 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,313,335 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,406 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 11,693,772 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8,121 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.