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Publishing perishing? Towards tomorrow's information architecture

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Bioinformatics, January 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
5 blogs
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
53 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
114 Mendeley
citeulike
19 CiteULike
connotea
16 Connotea
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Title
Publishing perishing? Towards tomorrow's information architecture
Published in
BMC Bioinformatics, January 2007
DOI 10.1186/1471-2105-8-17
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael R Seringhaus, Mark B Gerstein

Abstract

Scientific articles are tailored to present information in human-readable aliquots. Although the Internet has revolutionized the way our society thinks about information, the traditional text-based framework of the scientific article remains largely unchanged. This format imposes sharp constraints upon the type and quantity of biological information published today. Academic journals alone cannot capture the findings of modern genome-scale inquiry. Like many other disciplines, molecular biology is a science of facts: information inherently suited to database storage. In the past decade, a proliferation of public and private databases has emerged to house genome sequence, protein structure information, functional genomics data and more; these digital repositories are now a vital component of scientific communication. The next challenge is to integrate this vast and ever-growing body of information with academic journals and other media. To truly integrate scientific information we must modernize academic publishing to exploit the power of the Internet. This means more than online access to articles, hyperlinked references and web-based supplemental data; it means making articles fully computer-readable with intelligent markup and Structured Digital Abstracts.Here, we examine the changing roles of scholarly journals and databases. We present our vision of the optimal information architecture for the biosciences, and close with tangible steps to improve our handling of scientific information today while paving the way for an expansive central index in the future.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 114 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 14 12%
United Kingdom 4 4%
Sweden 3 3%
Portugal 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Other 8 7%
Unknown 79 69%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 38 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 18%
Librarian 10 9%
Other 9 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 8 7%
Other 25 22%
Unknown 3 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 33 29%
Computer Science 31 27%
Social Sciences 10 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 8%
Arts and Humanities 6 5%
Other 20 18%
Unknown 5 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 35. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 January 2013.
All research outputs
#408,899
of 12,373,386 outputs
Outputs from BMC Bioinformatics
#53
of 4,576 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#398,835
of 11,793,656 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Bioinformatics
#53
of 4,581 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,373,386 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,576 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 11,793,656 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,581 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.