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A model comparison reveals dynamic social information drives the movements of humbug damselfish ( Dascyllus aruanus )

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of The Royal Society Interface, January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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46 Mendeley
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Title
A model comparison reveals dynamic social information drives the movements of humbug damselfish ( Dascyllus aruanus )
Published in
Journal of The Royal Society Interface, January 2014
DOI 10.1098/rsif.2013.0794
Pubmed ID
Authors

R. P. Mann, J. E. Herbert-Read, Q. Ma, L. A. Jordan, D. J. T. Sumpter, A. J. W. Ward

Abstract

Animals make use a range of social information to inform their movement decisions. One common movement rule, found across many different species, is that the probability that an individual moves to an area increases with the number of conspecifics there. However, in many cases, it remains unclear what social cues produce this and other similar movement rules. Here, we investigate what cues are used by damselfish (Dascyllus aruanus) when repeatedly crossing back and forth between two coral patches in an experimental arena. We find that an individual's decision to move is best predicted by the recent movements of conspecifics either to or from that individual's current habitat. Rather than actively seeking attachment to a larger group, individuals are instead prioritizing highly local and dynamic information with very limited spatial and temporal ranges. By reanalysing data in which the same species crossed for the first time to a new coral patch, we show that the individuals use static cues in this case. This suggests that these fish alter their information usage according to the structure and familiarity of their environment by using stable information when moving to a novel area and localized dynamic information when moving between familiar areas.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 7%
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Australia 1 2%
Sweden 1 2%
Unknown 39 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 24%
Student > Master 9 20%
Researcher 7 15%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 7%
Other 11 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 28 61%
Unspecified 4 9%
Environmental Science 2 4%
Psychology 2 4%
Mathematics 2 4%
Other 8 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 November 2015.
All research outputs
#3,028,305
of 12,517,527 outputs
Outputs from Journal of The Royal Society Interface
#886
of 1,975 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,431
of 176,542 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of The Royal Society Interface
#14
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,517,527 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,975 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 176,542 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.