↓ Skip to main content

Bullying Victimization and Suicide Ideation and Behavior Among Adolescents in Europe: A 10-Country Study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Adolescent Health, August 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
3 blogs
twitter
16 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
101 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
318 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Bullying Victimization and Suicide Ideation and Behavior Among Adolescents in Europe: A 10-Country Study
Published in
Journal of Adolescent Health, August 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2017.02.002
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shira Barzilay, Anat Brunstein Klomek, Alan Apter, Vladimir Carli, Camilla Wasserman, Gergö Hadlaczky, Christina W. Hoven, Marco Sarchiapone, Judit Balazs, Agnes Kereszteny, Romuald Brunner, Michael Kaess, Julio Bobes, Pilar Saiz, Doina Cosman, Christian Haring, Raphaela Banzer, Paul Corcoran, Jean-Pierre Kahn, Vita Postuvan, Tina Podlogar, Merike Sisask, Airi Varnik, Danuta Wasserman

Abstract

To examine risk and protective factors moderating the associations between three types of bullying victimization (physical, verbal, and relational bullying) with suicide ideation/attempts in a large representative sample of European adolescents. We analyzed cross-sectional data on 11,110 students (mean age = 14.9, standard deviation = .89) recruited from 168 schools in 10 European Union countries involved in the Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe study. A self-report questionnaire was used to measure victimization types, depression, anxiety, parental and peer support, and suicide ideation and attempts. For each outcome, we applied hierarchical nonlinear models controlling for sociodemographics. Prevalence of victimization was 9.4% physical, 36.1% verbal, and 33.0% relational. Boys were more likely to be physically and verbally victimized, whereas girls were more prone to relational victimization. Physical victimization was associated with suicide ideation, and relational victimization was associated with suicide attempts. Other associations between victimization and suicidality (ideation/attempts) were identified through analysis of interactions with additional risk and protective factors. Specifically, verbal victimization was associated with suicide ideation among adolescents with depression who perceived low parental support. Similarly, low peer support increased the associations between verbal victimization and suicide ideation. Verbal victimization was associated with suicide attempts among adolescents with anxiety who perceived low parental support. Findings support the development of prevention strategies for adolescent victims of bullying who may be at elevated risk for suicide ideation/behavior, by taking into account gender, the type of bullying, symptomatology, and availability of interpersonal support.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 318 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 317 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 42 13%
Student > Master 40 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 37 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 26 8%
Researcher 26 8%
Other 60 19%
Unknown 87 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 103 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 37 12%
Social Sciences 31 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 24 8%
Neuroscience 5 2%
Other 22 7%
Unknown 96 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 32. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 March 2018.
All research outputs
#788,029
of 17,778,103 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Adolescent Health
#461
of 3,882 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,937
of 274,796 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Adolescent Health
#8
of 59 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,778,103 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,882 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,796 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 59 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.