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Psychological debriefing for preventing post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, April 2002
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
13 blogs
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
47 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
7 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
574 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
488 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
Psychological debriefing for preventing post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, April 2002
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd000560
Pubmed ID
Authors

Suzanna C Rose, Jonathan Bisson, Rachel Churchill, Simon Wessely

Abstract

Over approximately the last last fifteen years early psychological interventions such as psychological 'debriefing' have been increasingly used to treat psychological trauma. While these intervention have become popular and their use spread to several settings - efficacy had largely not been tested emprically. In 1997 a systmatic review of single session psychological "debriefing" was undertaken and this subsequently became a protocol and Cochrane Review published in 1998 (Issue2). This update forms the first substantive update of the original review. To assess the effectiveness of brief psychological debriefing for the management of psychological distress after trauma, and the prevention of post traumatic stress disorder. Electronic searching of MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychLit, PILOTS, Biosis, Pascal, Occ. Safety and Health,SOCIOFILE, CINAHL, PSYCINFO, PSYNDEX, SIGLE, LILACS, CCTR, CINAHL, NRR, Hand search of Journal of Traumatic Stress. Contact with leading researchers. The inclusion criteria for all randomized studies was that they should focus on persons recently (one month or less) exposed to a traumatic event, should consist of a single session only, and that the intervention involve some form of emotional processing/ventilation by encouraging recollection/reworking of the traumatic event accompanied by normalisation of emotional reaction to the event. 11 trials fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Quality was generally poor. Data from two trials could not be synthesised. Two trials involved the use of the intervention in an obstetric setting. Single session individual debriefing did not reduce psychological distress nor prevent the onset of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Those who received the intervention showed no significant short term (3-5 months) in the risk of PTSD (odds ratio 1.22 (95% ci 0.60 to 2.46 )). At one year one trial reported that there was a significantly increased risk of PTSD in those receiving debriefing (odds ratio 2.88 (1.11 to 7.53))odds ratio 95%). There was also no evidence that debriefing reduced general psychological morbidity, depression or anxiety. There is no current evidence that psychological debriefing is a useful treatment for the prevention of post traumatic stress disorder after traumatic incidents. Compulsory debriefing of victims of trauma should cease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 47 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 488 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 1%
Canada 5 1%
United Kingdom 5 1%
Australia 4 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Pakistan 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Other 4 <1%
Unknown 458 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 86 18%
Student > Bachelor 72 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 65 13%
Researcher 60 12%
Other 39 8%
Other 127 26%
Unknown 39 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 202 41%
Medicine and Dentistry 101 21%
Social Sciences 51 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 33 7%
Business, Management and Accounting 11 2%
Other 35 7%
Unknown 55 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 165. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 December 2019.
All research outputs
#92,312
of 14,098,451 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#197
of 10,846 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,787
of 13,352,233 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#190
of 9,757 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,098,451 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,846 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 13,352,233 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9,757 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.