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Global distribution of genomic diversity underscores rich complex history of continental human populations

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Research, February 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
137 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
257 Mendeley
citeulike
7 CiteULike
connotea
1 Connotea
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Title
Global distribution of genomic diversity underscores rich complex history of continental human populations
Published in
Genome Research, February 2009
DOI 10.1101/gr.088898.108
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. Auton, K. Bryc, A. R. Boyko, K. E. Lohmueller, J. Novembre, A. Reynolds, A. Indap, M. H. Wright, J. D. Degenhardt, R. N. Gutenkunst, K. S. King, M. R. Nelson, C. D. Bustamante

Abstract

Characterizing patterns of genetic variation within and among human populations is important for understanding human evolutionary history and for careful design of medical genetic studies. Here, we analyze patterns of variation across 443,434 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 3845 individuals from four continental regions. This unique resource allows us to illuminate patterns of diversity in previously under-studied populations at the genome-wide scale including Latin America, South Asia, and Southern Europe. Key insights afforded by our analysis include quantifying the degree of admixture in a large collection of individuals from Guadalajara, Mexico; identifying language and geography as key determinants of population structure within India; and elucidating a north-south gradient in haplotype diversity within Europe. We also present a novel method for identifying long-range tracts of homozygosity indicative of recent common ancestry. Application of our approach suggests great variation within and among populations in the extent of homozygosity, suggesting both demographic history (such as population bottlenecks) and recent ancestry events (such as consanguinity) play an important role in patterning variation in large modern human populations.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 257 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 19 7%
United Kingdom 4 2%
France 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Uruguay 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Other 3 1%
Unknown 222 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 71 28%
Researcher 69 27%
Professor > Associate Professor 23 9%
Student > Master 19 7%
Student > Bachelor 17 7%
Other 44 17%
Unknown 14 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 162 63%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 35 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 5%
Social Sciences 6 2%
Computer Science 5 2%
Other 14 5%
Unknown 21 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 August 2009.
All research outputs
#2,034,144
of 14,069,062 outputs
Outputs from Genome Research
#1,395
of 3,571 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,953,411
of 13,328,067 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Research
#1,392
of 3,535 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,069,062 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,571 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 13,328,067 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,535 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.