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The role of the cerebellum in schizophrenia: from cognition to molecular pathways

Overview of attention for article published in Clinics, January 2011
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2 tweeters
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1 Redditor

Citations

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79 Dimensions

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169 Mendeley
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Title
The role of the cerebellum in schizophrenia: from cognition to molecular pathways
Published in
Clinics, January 2011
DOI 10.1590/s1807-59322011001300009
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peyman Yeganeh-Doost, Oliver Gruber, Peter Falkai, Andrea Schmitt

Abstract

Beside its role in motor coordination, the cerebellum is involved in cognitive function such as attention, working memory, verbal learning, and sensory discrimination. In schizophrenia, a disturbed prefronto-thalamo-cerebellar circuit has been proposed to play a role in the pathophysiology. In addition, a deficit in the glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDAf) receptor has been hypothesized. The risk gene neuregulin 1 may play a major role in this process. We demonstrated a higher expression of the NMDA receptor subunit 2D in the right cerebellar regions of schizophrenia patients, which may be a secondary upregulation due to a dysfunctional receptor. In contrast, the neuregulin 1 risk variant containing at least one C-allele was associated with decreased expression of NMDA receptor subunit 2C, leading to a dysfunction of the NMDA receptor, which in turn may lead to a dysfunction of the gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) system. Accordingly, from post-mortem studies, there is accumulating evidence that GABAergic signaling is decreased in the cerebellum of schizophrenia patients. As patients in these studies are treated with antipsychotics long term, we evaluated the effect of long-term haloperidol and clozapine treatment in an animal model. We showed that clozapine may be superior to haloperidol in restoring a deficit in NMDA receptor subunit 2C expression in the cerebellum. We discuss the molecular findings in the light of the role of the cerebellum in attention and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 169 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
Germany 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Israel 1 <1%
Unknown 161 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 19%
Researcher 30 18%
Student > Master 22 13%
Student > Bachelor 19 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 9%
Other 33 20%
Unknown 18 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 42 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 31 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 13%
Psychology 21 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 4%
Other 20 12%
Unknown 26 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 August 2018.
All research outputs
#13,161,766
of 22,727,570 outputs
Outputs from Clinics
#442
of 1,055 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#132,630
of 180,461 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinics
#35
of 68 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,727,570 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,055 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 180,461 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 68 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.