↓ Skip to main content

Do in-vivo behaviors predict early response in family-based treatment for anorexia nervosa?

Overview of attention for article published in Behaviour Research & Therapy, November 2013
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
28 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Do in-vivo behaviors predict early response in family-based treatment for anorexia nervosa?
Published in
Behaviour Research & Therapy, November 2013
DOI 10.1016/j.brat.2013.09.003
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alison M Darcy, Susan W Bryson, W Stewart Agras, Kathleen Kara Fitzpatrick, Daniel Le Grange, James Lock

Abstract

The aim of the study is to explore whether identified parental and patient behaviors observed in the first few sessions of family-based treatment (FBT) predict early response (weight gain of 1.8 kg by session four) to treatment. Therapy film recordings from 21 adolescent participants recruited into the FBT arm of a multi-site randomized clinical trial were coded for the presence of behaviors (length of observed behavior divided by length of session recording) in the first, second and fourth sessions. Behaviors that differed between early responders and non-early responders on univariate analysis were entered into discriminant class analyses. Participants with fewer negative verbal behaviors in the first session and were away from table during the meal session less had the greatest rates of early response. Parents who made fewer critical statements and who did not repeatedly present food during the meal session had children who had the greatest rates of early response. In-vivo behaviors in early sessions of FBT may predict early response to FBT. Adaptations to address participant resistance and to decrease the numbers of critical comments made by parents while encouraging their children to eat might improve early response to FBT.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 21%
Student > Master 5 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 14%
Student > Postgraduate 3 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 11%
Other 7 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 19 68%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 18%
Environmental Science 1 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Sports and Recreations 1 4%
Other 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 December 2013.
All research outputs
#2,183,720
of 6,230,693 outputs
Outputs from Behaviour Research & Therapy
#654
of 1,057 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,117
of 114,059 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Behaviour Research & Therapy
#17
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,230,693 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 64th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,057 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 114,059 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.