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Ethiopian patients’ perceptions of anti-diabetic medications: implications for diabetes education

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

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52 Mendeley
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Title
Ethiopian patients’ perceptions of anti-diabetic medications: implications for diabetes education
Published in
Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40545-017-0101-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bruck Messele Habte, Tedla Kebede, Teferi Gedif Fenta, Heather Boon

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to explore medication-related perceptions of adult patients with type 2 diabetes attending treatment in public hospitals of urban centers in central Ethiopia. Qualitative in-depth interviews were held with 39 participants selected to represent a range of treatment experiences and socio-demographic characteristics who were attending their treatment in 3 public hospitals. Interviews continued until key themes were saturated. The interview and analysis was guided by Horne's necessity-concerns model. The findings revealed medication-related perceptions some of which were similar to those of Western patients and others that seem to be informed by local socio-cultural contexts. Participants' perceptions focused on the necessity of and concerns about their anti-diabetic medications, giving more emphasis to the latter. Concerns were expressed about both perceived and experienced adverse effects, inconveniences in handling the medications and access. It was evident that some of these concerns were exaggerated but could nevertheless negatively affect adherence to prescribed medications including resistance to initiate insulin with potential impact on health outcomes. Understanding patients' perceptions of their medications is critical for developing a diabetes education program that considers local contexts and beliefs to enhance adherence. Education programs should consider patients' concerns about medication adverse effects and reasons for use so as to improve their adherence and health outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 52 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 17%
Lecturer 5 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Researcher 3 6%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 21 40%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 19%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 13%
Unspecified 2 4%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 23 44%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 May 2017.
All research outputs
#8,341,330
of 15,811,518 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
#128
of 238 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#113,552
of 268,329 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,811,518 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 238 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,329 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them