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Randomised trial of a parent-mediated intervention for infants at high risk for autism: longitudinal outcomes to age 3 years

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry, April 2017
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#18 of 2,139)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

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Title
Randomised trial of a parent-mediated intervention for infants at high risk for autism: longitudinal outcomes to age 3 years
Published in
Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry, April 2017
DOI 10.1111/jcpp.12728
Pubmed ID
Authors

Green, J., Pickles, A., Pasco, G., Bedford, R., Wan, M.W., Elsabbagh, M., Slonims, V., Gliga, T., Jones, E.J.H., Cheung, C.H.M., Charman, T., Johnson, M.H., J. Green, A. Pickles, G. Pasco, R. Bedford, M.W. Wan, M. Elsabbagh, V. Slonims, T. Gliga, E.J.H. Jones, C.H.M. Cheung, T. Charman, M.H. Johnson, Green, Jonathan, Pickles, Andrew, Pasco, Greg, Bedford, Rachael, Wan, Ming Wai, Elsabbagh, Mayada, Slonims, Vicky, Gliga, Teea, Jones, Emily, Cheung, Celeste, Charman, Tony, Johnson, Mark, Jonathan Green, Andrew Pickles, Greg Pasco, Rachael Bedford, Ming Wai Wan, Mayada Elsabbagh, Vicky Slonims, Teea Gliga, Emily Jones, Celeste Cheung, Tony Charman, Mark Johnson, The British Autism Study of Infant Siblings (BASIS) Team, Simon Baron‐Cohen, Patrick Bolton, Kim Davies, Michelle Liew, Janice Fernandes, Isobel Gammer, Erica Salomone, Helena Ribeiro, Leslie Tucker, Carol Taylor, Rhonda Booth, Claire Harrop, Samina Holsgrove, Janet McNally,

Abstract

There has been increasing interest in the potential for pre-emptive interventions in the prodrome of autism, but little investigation as to their effect. A two-site, two-arm assessor-blinded randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a 12-session parent-mediated social communication intervention delivered between 9 and 14 months of age (Intervention in the British Autism Study of Infant Siblings-Video Interaction for Promoting Positive Parenting), against no intervention. Fifty-four infants (28 intervention, 26 nonintervention) at familial risk of autism but not otherwise selected for developmental atypicality were assessed at 9-month baseline, 15-month treatment endpoint, and 27- and 39-month follow-up. severity of autism prodromal symptoms, blind-rated on Autism Observation Schedule for Infants or Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule 2nd Edition across the four assessment points. blind-rated parent-child interaction and child language; nonblind parent-rated communication and socialisation. Prespecified intention-to-treat analysis combined estimates from repeated measures within correlated regressions to estimate the overall effect of the infancy intervention over time. Effect estimates in favour of intervention on autism prodromal symptoms, maximal at 27 months, had confidence intervals (CIs) at each separate time point including the null, but showed a significant overall effect over the course of the intervention and follow-up period (effect size [ES] = 0.32; 95% CI 0.04, 0.60; p = .026). Effects on proximal intervention targets of parent nondirectiveness/synchrony (ES = 0.33; CI 0.04, 0.63; p = .013) and child attentiveness/communication initiation (ES = 0.36; 95% CI 0.04, 0.68; p = .015) showed similar results. There was no effect on categorical diagnostic outcome or formal language measures. Follow-up to 3 years of the first RCT of a very early social communication intervention for infants at familial risk of developing autism has shown a treatment effect, extending 24 months after intervention end, to reduce the overall severity of autism prodromal symptoms and enhance parent-child dyadic social communication over this period. We highlight the value of extended follow-up and repeat assessment for early intervention trials.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 44 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 25%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 16%
Researcher 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Other 9 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 20 45%
Unspecified 7 16%
Social Sciences 6 14%
Arts and Humanities 3 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Other 6 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 254. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 July 2018.
All research outputs
#36,440
of 11,472,431 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry
#18
of 2,139 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,303
of 265,822 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry
#3
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,472,431 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,139 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,822 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.