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GRMD cardiac and skeletal muscle metabolism gene profiles are distinct

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Genomics, April 2017
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Title
GRMD cardiac and skeletal muscle metabolism gene profiles are distinct
Published in
BMC Medical Genomics, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12920-017-0257-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Larry W. Markham, Candice L. Brinkmeyer-Langford, Jonathan H. Soslow, Manisha Gupte, Douglas B. Sawyer, Joe N. Kornegay, Cristi L. Galindo

Abstract

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the DMD gene, which codes for the dystrophin protein. While progress has been made in defining the molecular basis and pathogenesis of DMD, major gaps remain in understanding mechanisms that contribute to the marked delay in cardiac compared to skeletal muscle dysfunction. To address this question, we analyzed cardiac and skeletal muscle tissue microarrays from golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs, a genetically and clinically homologous model for DMD. A total of 15 dogs, 3 each GRMD and controls at 6 and 12 months plus 3 older (47-93 months) GRMD dogs, were assessed. GRMD dogs exhibited tissue- and age-specific transcriptional profiles and enriched functions in skeletal but not cardiac muscle, consistent with a "metabolic crisis" seen with DMD microarray studies. Most notably, dozens of energy production-associated molecules, including all of the TCA cycle enzymes and multiple electron transport components, were down regulated. Glycolytic and glycolysis shunt pathway-associated enzymes, such as those of the anabolic pentose phosphate pathway, were also altered, in keeping with gene expression in other forms of muscle atrophy. On the other hand, GRMD cardiac muscle genes were enriched in nucleotide metabolism and pathways that are critical for neuromuscular junction maintenance, synaptic function and conduction. These findings suggest differential metabolic dysfunction may contribute to distinct pathological phenotypes in skeletal and cardiac muscle.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 4%
Unknown 24 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 12%
Researcher 3 12%
Student > Master 3 12%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 8%
Other 4 16%
Unknown 8 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 5 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 8%
Unspecified 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 7 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 April 2017.
All research outputs
#7,135,753
of 9,689,121 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Genomics
#388
of 510 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#173,288
of 263,000 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Genomics
#10
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,689,121 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 510 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.