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Impaired endocannabinoid signalling in the rostral ventromedial medulla underpins genotype-dependent hyper-responsivity to noxious stimuli

Overview of attention for article published in Pain (03043959), January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
47 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
45 Mendeley
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Title
Impaired endocannabinoid signalling in the rostral ventromedial medulla underpins genotype-dependent hyper-responsivity to noxious stimuli
Published in
Pain (03043959), January 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.pain.2013.09.012
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kieran Rea, Weredeselam M. Olango, Bright N. Okine, Manish K. Madasu, Iseult C. McGuire, Kathleen Coyle, Brendan Harhen, Michelle Roche, David P. Finn

Abstract

Pain is both a sensory and an emotional experience, and is subject to modulation by a number of factors including genetic background modulating stress/affect. The Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat exhibits a stress-hyper-responsive and depressive-like phenotype and increased sensitivity to noxious stimuli, compared with other rat strains. Here, we show that this genotype-dependent hyperalgesia is associated with impaired pain-related mobilisation of endocannabinoids and transcription of their synthesising enzymes in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM). Pharmacological blockade of the Cannabinoid1 (CB1) receptor potentiates the hyperalgesia in WKY rats, whereas inhibition of the endocannabinoid catabolising enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase, attenuates the hyperalgesia. The latter effect is mediated by CB1 receptors in the RVM. Together, these behavioural, neurochemical, and molecular data indicate that impaired endocannabinoid signalling in the RVM underpins hyper-responsivity to noxious stimuli in a genetic background prone to heightened stress/affect.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 43 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 22%
Student > Bachelor 10 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 16%
Other 4 9%
Professor 4 9%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 5 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 27%
Neuroscience 10 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 9%
Psychology 2 4%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 6 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 February 2014.
All research outputs
#1,266,644
of 12,280,746 outputs
Outputs from Pain (03043959)
#851
of 4,468 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#19,295
of 168,515 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Pain (03043959)
#22
of 135 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,280,746 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,468 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 168,515 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 135 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.