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Isolation and characterization of a bat SARS-like coronavirus that uses the ACE2 receptor

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, October 2013
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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664 Dimensions

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1254 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Isolation and characterization of a bat SARS-like coronavirus that uses the ACE2 receptor
Published in
Nature, October 2013
DOI 10.1038/nature12711
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xing-Yi Ge, Jia-Lu Li, Xing-Lou Yang, Aleksei A. Chmura, Guangjian Zhu, Jonathan H. Epstein, Jonna K. Mazet, Ben Hu, Wei Zhang, Cheng Peng, Yu-Ji Zhang, Chu-Ming Luo, Bing Tan, Ning Wang, Yan Zhu, Gary Crameri, Shu-Yi Zhang, Lin-Fa Wang, Peter Daszak, Zheng-Li Shi

Abstract

The 2002-3 pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) was one of the most significant public health events in recent history. An ongoing outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus suggests that this group of viruses remains a key threat and that their distribution is wider than previously recognized. Although bats have been suggested to be the natural reservoirs of both viruses, attempts to isolate the progenitor virus of SARS-CoV from bats have been unsuccessful. Diverse SARS-like coronaviruses (SL-CoVs) have now been reported from bats in China, Europe and Africa, but none is considered a direct progenitor of SARS-CoV because of their phylogenetic disparity from this virus and the inability of their spike proteins to use the SARS-CoV cellular receptor molecule, the human angiotensin converting enzyme II (ACE2). Here we report whole-genome sequences of two novel bat coronaviruses from Chinese horseshoe bats (family: Rhinolophidae) in Yunnan, China: RsSHC014 and Rs3367. These viruses are far more closely related to SARS-CoV than any previously identified bat coronaviruses, particularly in the receptor binding domain of the spike protein. Most importantly, we report the first recorded isolation of a live SL-CoV (bat SL-CoV-WIV1) from bat faecal samples in Vero E6 cells, which has typical coronavirus morphology, 99.9% sequence identity to Rs3367 and uses ACE2 from humans, civets and Chinese horseshoe bats for cell entry. Preliminary in vitro testing indicates that WIV1 also has a broad species tropism. Our results provide the strongest evidence to date that Chinese horseshoe bats are natural reservoirs of SARS-CoV, and that intermediate hosts may not be necessary for direct human infection by some bat SL-CoVs. They also highlight the importance of pathogen-discovery programs targeting high-risk wildlife groups in emerging disease hotspots as a strategy for pandemic preparedness.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,254 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 1245 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 224 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 186 15%
Student > Master 168 13%
Student > Bachelor 149 12%
Other 75 6%
Other 243 19%
Unknown 209 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 231 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 190 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 155 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 91 7%
Chemistry 38 3%
Other 272 22%
Unknown 277 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1975. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 October 2020.
All research outputs
#1,796
of 16,074,715 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#260
of 76,324 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15
of 189,158 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#3
of 990 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,074,715 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 76,324 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 86.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 189,158 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 990 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.