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The Elusive Baseline of Marine Disease: Are Diseases in Ocean Ecosystems Increasing?

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS Biology, April 2004
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter

Readers on

mendeley
555 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
The Elusive Baseline of Marine Disease: Are Diseases in Ocean Ecosystems Increasing?
Published in
PLoS Biology, April 2004
DOI 10.1371/journal.pbio.0020120
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jessica R Ward, Kevin D Lafferty

Abstract

Disease outbreaks alter the structure and function of marine ecosystems, directly affecting vertebrates (mammals, turtles, fish), invertebrates (corals, crustaceans, echinoderms), and plants (seagrasses). Previous studies suggest a recent increase in marine disease. However, lack of baseline data in most communities prevents a direct test of this hypothesis. We developed a proxy to evaluate a prediction of the increasing disease hypothesis: the proportion of scientific publications reporting disease increased in recent decades. This represents, to our knowledge, the first quantitative use of normalized trends in the literature to investigate an ecological hypothesis. We searched a literature database for reports of parasites and disease (hereafter "disease") in nine marine taxonomic groups from 1970 to 2001. Reports, normalized for research effort, increased in turtles, corals, mammals, urchins, and molluscs. No significant trends were detected for seagrasses, decapods, or sharks/rays (though disease occurred in these groups). Counter to the prediction, disease reports decreased in fishes. Formulating effective resource management policy requires understanding the basis and timing of marine disease events. Why disease outbreaks increased in some groups but not in others should be a priority for future investigation. The increase in several groups lends urgency to understanding disease dynamics, particularly since few viable options currently exist to mitigate disease in the oceans.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 555 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 11 2%
United States 10 2%
Colombia 3 <1%
Mexico 3 <1%
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Australia 2 <1%
New Zealand 2 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
Other 11 2%
Unknown 506 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 116 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 101 18%
Student > Bachelor 89 16%
Student > Master 84 15%
Professor > Associate Professor 27 5%
Other 90 16%
Unknown 48 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 329 59%
Environmental Science 87 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 17 3%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 17 3%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 15 3%
Other 31 6%
Unknown 59 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 59. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 August 2021.
All research outputs
#573,166
of 21,859,856 outputs
Outputs from PLoS Biology
#1,135
of 5,965 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,676
of 209,491 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS Biology
#14
of 77 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,859,856 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,965 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 56.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 209,491 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 77 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.