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TST positivity in household contacts of tuberculosis patients: a case-contact study in Malawi

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2017
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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57 Mendeley
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Title
TST positivity in household contacts of tuberculosis patients: a case-contact study in Malawi
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2348-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jonas Hector, Suzanne T. Anderson, Gertrude Banda, Mercy Kamdolozi, Laura F. Jefferys, Doris Shani, Natalie J. Garton, Agnes Mwale, Annie Jobe, Geraint R. Davies, Derek J Sloan

Abstract

Screening household contacts of active tuberculosis (TB) patients is recommended for TB control. Due to resource constraints this rarely occurs in lower income countries. Demographic and clinical features of index cases may influence the likelihood of onwards TB transmission. It has also been proposed that accumulation of intracellular lipid bodies within M. tuberculosis cells may also enhance bacterial transmissibility. This study explored whether clinical and bacteriological observations recorded at baseline in TB cases in Malawi could help identify those with the highest risk of onwards transmission, to prioritise contact tracing. In this case-contact study, data on clinical presentation, sputum bacterial load and the percentage of lipid body positive acid-fast bacilli (%LB + AFB) on sputum smears were recorded in adults with sputum smear and culture positive pulmonary TB before initiation of therapy. The Tuberculin Skin Test (TST) was used to detect infection with M. tuberculosis amongst household contacts under the age of 15 years. TST positivity of the child contacts was related to characteristics of the index case. Thirty four index cases brought 56 contacts (median: 1, range: 1-4 contacts each). 37 (66%) of contacts had a positive TST. Cavities or a high percentage of lung affected on index patient CXRs were associated with TST positivity. Multivariate analysis of non-radiological factors showed that male sex, HIV-negative status and raised peripheral blood white blood count (WBC) in index patients were also independent risk factors of TST positivity. Lower %LB + AFB counts were associated with TST positivity on univariate analysis only. TST positivity is common amongst household contacts of sputum smear positive adult TB patients in Malawi. Contact tracing in this high risk population could be guided by prioritising index cases with CXR cavities and extensive radiological disease or, in the absence of CXRs, those who are HIV-negative with a raised WBC.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 57 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 18%
Researcher 9 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 14%
Student > Postgraduate 7 12%
Lecturer 4 7%
Other 13 23%
Unknown 6 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 47%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Other 10 18%
Unknown 10 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 June 2017.
All research outputs
#4,649,885
of 15,916,110 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,437
of 5,796 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,176
of 268,427 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,916,110 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,796 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,427 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them