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Effective Leadership of Surgical Teams: A Mixed Methods Study of Surgeon Behaviors and Functions

Overview of attention for article published in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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79 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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50 Mendeley
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Title
Effective Leadership of Surgical Teams: A Mixed Methods Study of Surgeon Behaviors and Functions
Published in
The Annals of Thoracic Surgery, August 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2017.01.021
Pubmed ID
Authors

Juliana L. Stone, Emma-Louise Aveling, Molly Frean, Morgan C. Shields, Cameron Wright, Francesca Gino, Thoralf M. Sundt, Sara J. Singer

Abstract

The importance of effective team leadership for achieving surgical excellence is widely accepted, but we understand less about the behaviors that achieve this goal. We studied cardiac surgical teams to identify leadership behaviors that best support surgical teamwork. We observed, surveyed, and interviewed cardiac surgical teams, including 7 surgeons and 116 team members, from September 2013 to April 2015. We documented 1,926 surgeon/team member interactions during 22 cases, coded them by behavior type and valence (ie, positive/negative/neutral), and characterized them by leadership function (conductor, elucidator, delegator, engagement facilitator, tone setter, being human, and safe space maker) to create a novel framework of surgical leadership derived from direct observation. We surveyed nonsurgeon team members about their perceptions of individual surgeon's leadership effectiveness on a 7-point Likert scale and correlated survey measures with individual surgeon profiles created by calculating percentage of behavior types, leader functions, and valence. Surgeon leadership was rated by nonsurgeons from 4.2 to 6.2 (mean, 5.4). Among the 33 types of behaviors observed, most interactions constituted elucidating (24%) and tone setting (20%). Overall, 66% of interactions (range, 43%-84%) were positive and 11% (range, 1%-45%) were negative. The percentage of positive and negative behaviors correlated strongly (r = 0.85 for positive and r = 0.75 for negative, p < 0.05) with nonsurgeon evaluations of leadership. Facilitating engagement related most positively (r = 0.80; p = 0.03), and negative forms of elucidating, ie, criticism, related most negatively (r = -0.81; p = 0.03). We identified 7 surgeon leadership functions and related behaviors that impact perceptions of leadership. These observations suggest actionable opportunities to improve team leadership behavior.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 79 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 50 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 22%
Unspecified 9 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 12%
Professor 4 8%
Other 4 8%
Other 16 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 26%
Unspecified 13 26%
Psychology 7 14%
Social Sciences 6 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 10%
Other 6 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 48. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 October 2018.
All research outputs
#377,924
of 13,846,397 outputs
Outputs from The Annals of Thoracic Surgery
#78
of 5,324 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,393
of 264,416 outputs
Outputs of similar age from The Annals of Thoracic Surgery
#9
of 116 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,846,397 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,324 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,416 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 116 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.