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Thalidomide stimulates vessel maturation and reduces epistaxis in individuals with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Medicine, April 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Citations

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206 Dimensions

Readers on

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197 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
Title
Thalidomide stimulates vessel maturation and reduces epistaxis in individuals with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia
Published in
Nature Medicine, April 2010
DOI 10.1038/nm.2131
Pubmed ID
Authors

Franck Lebrin, Samly Srun, Karine Raymond, Sabrina Martin, Stieneke van den Brink, Catarina Freitas, Christiane Bréant, Thomas Mathivet, Bruno Larrivée, Jean-Léon Thomas, Helen M Arthur, Cornelis J J Westermann, Frans Disch, Johannes J Mager, Repke J Snijder, Anne Eichmann, Christine L Mummery

Abstract

Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an inherited disorder characterized by vascular malformations. Many affected individuals develop recurrent nosebleeds, which can severely affect their quality of life and are clinically difficult to treat. We report here that treatment with thalidomide reduced the severity and frequency of nosebleeds (epistaxis) in the majority of a small group of subjects with HHT tested. The blood hemoglobin levels of the treated individuals rose as a result of reduced hemorrhage and enhanced blood vessel stabilization. In mice heterozygous for a null mutation in the Eng gene (encoding endoglin), an experimental model of HHT, thalidomide treatment stimulated mural cell coverage and thus rescued vessel wall defects. Thalidomide treatment increased platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B) expression in endothelial cells and stimulated mural cell activation. The effects of thalidomide treatment were partially reversed by pharmacological or genetic interference with PDGF signaling from endothelial cells to pericytes. Biopsies of nasal epithelium from individuals with HHT treated or not with thalidomide showed that similar mechanisms may explain the effects of thalidomide treatment in humans. Our findings demonstrate the ability of thalidomide to induce vessel maturation, which may be useful as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of vascular malformations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 197 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 4 2%
United States 3 2%
Germany 2 1%
United Kingdom 2 1%
France 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 181 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 50 25%
Researcher 50 25%
Other 15 8%
Student > Master 14 7%
Professor 14 7%
Other 54 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 75 38%
Medicine and Dentistry 70 36%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 27 14%
Neuroscience 8 4%
Unspecified 6 3%
Other 11 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 28. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 December 2015.
All research outputs
#412,596
of 11,300,336 outputs
Outputs from Nature Medicine
#1,028
of 6,065 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,964
of 83,915 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Medicine
#9
of 118 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,300,336 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,065 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 83,915 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 118 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.