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Depression and Risk for Problem Drinking in Latino Migrant Day Laborers

Overview of attention for article published in Substance Use & Misuse, March 2017
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1 tweeter
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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28 Mendeley
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Title
Depression and Risk for Problem Drinking in Latino Migrant Day Laborers
Published in
Substance Use & Misuse, March 2017
DOI 10.1080/10826084.2016.1276599
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kurt C. Organista, Sonya G. Arreola, Torsten B. Neilands

Abstract

Given the structural vulnerability of Latino migrant day laborers (LMDLs) to unstable and poorly paying work, harsh living conditions and frequent inability to support or even visit families in country of origin, psychological distress is a common response and one frequently implicated in risky outcomes such as problem drinking. The purpose of this study was to examine the relation of three different forms of psychological distress to problem drinking in LMDLs: depression, anxiety, and desesperación, the latter a popular Latino culture-based idiom of psychological distress. A cross sectional survey of 344 LMDLs was conducted in the San Francisco Bay Area from January to June of 2014. Independent contributions of depression, anxiety, and desesperación in explaining problem drinking as measured by a modified version of the AUDIT, were assessed using multiple linear regression analysis. Depression was significantly associated with risk for problem drinking while other forms of psychological distress were not. Conclusion/Importance: Findings provide stronger empirical support for the association between depression and problem drinking, a long suspected but under-demonstrated relationship in the literature on LMDLs. Implications for preventing problem drinking as well as mitigating psychological distress more generally for LMDLs are discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 11%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Other 3 11%
Unknown 4 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 5 18%
Psychology 3 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 7%
Materials Science 2 7%
Other 5 18%
Unknown 8 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 April 2017.
All research outputs
#7,129,089
of 9,679,413 outputs
Outputs from Substance Use & Misuse
#961
of 1,177 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#173,931
of 264,039 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Substance Use & Misuse
#22
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,679,413 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,177 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,039 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.